Can you check this diagram?

Discussion in 'Pickups & Electronics [BG]' started by Will_White, Nov 23, 2015.


  1. Will_White

    Will_White

    Jul 1, 2011
    Salem, OR
    I'm working on a bass with a single humbucking pickup, it's going to have passive electronics, with a volume, standard tone, Bass roll off, series/split/parallel switch, and a fat switch that puts a large cap in parallel to the grounded coil of the humbucker in series leaving single coil highs and humbucker lows, in parallel it works as a standard tone cap effecting everything. Now my question is would it be better to have the bass and treble controls on one knob ( Edit: turning one way cuts treble and the other way cuts bass) using a modified TBX as discussed here> http://www.thegearpage.net/board/in...t-on-the-same-tone-pot.1474820/#post-18537263
    or using two separate pots as discussed here> Two-Band “PTB” Tone Control: Useful, Easy, Cheap & AWESOME! « tonefiend archives

    On one hand having one pot control both is kind of cool, but on the other hand I can't help but think that I'll be losing some versatility and three knobs on a passive single pickup bass is cool in its own right. So thoughts?
    EDIT:
     
    Last edited: Nov 24, 2015
  2. 40Hz

    40Hz Supporting Member

    One control per parameter is generally considered preferable from an ergonomic viewpoint unless space constraints get it the way.
     
    Will_White likes this.
  3. Will_White

    Will_White

    Jul 1, 2011
    Salem, OR
    I might of edited the OP after you posted, but with the modified TBX turning one way would cut bass and the other way would cut treble. So it would still be one control per parameter if I understand what your saying.
     
    Last edited: Nov 23, 2015
  4. 40Hz

    40Hz Supporting Member

    For all intents and purposes it's a single parameter when it's ganged in that manner because the ratio between the low and high frequency cuts are fixed by the ganged design.

    FWIW, I'm not sure why you'd want cut to low frequencies like that on a bass. For guitar (I put one on my Tele) it makes sense. But I don't see where it does on a bass. YMMV.

    But if you're going with a TBX, check out this article on mods to the standard configuration. There might be something in there you can use. You'll probably want to play around with the tone cap value if nothing else.

    I personally always thought that playing around with various coil splitting and switching options, adding a passive midrange choke circuit, or putting in a tone cap selector switch (commonly called a "varitone" circuit) gives you a lot more bang for the effort. But that's me. Some people offer these sort of circuits ready made if you're not handy with a soldiering iron. One source is here. There are others like Stellartone that have similar devices for sale. (Disclaimer: I'm not affiliated with the people in the link provided.)

    Check this guy's video for how he gets a huge variety of sounds out of dual humbucker setup purely by changing things up between pickups selected, single and dual coil modes, and series/parallel operation. (Schematic here.) The guitar he built doesn't have a tone control at all. It is about guitar, but it might give you some ideas for further experimentation when you're coming up with your own designs if you add a second pickup someday..
     
    Last edited: Nov 23, 2015
  5. Will_White

    Will_White

    Jul 1, 2011
    Salem, OR
    20151123_231737.jpg
    I decided I'm going with seperate Bass and Treble Cuts. Does the above diagram look good, it's (L>R) bass cut, treble cut volume on the top row, a series/split/parallel switch and a "fat switch" (DPDT switch that puts one of two capacitors in parallel with the grounded coil cutting highs on only one coil of the humbucker giving humbucker lows and single coil highs)
     
  6. Will_White

    Will_White

    Jul 1, 2011
    Salem, OR
    Bump
     
  7. Primary

    Primary TB Assistant

    Here are some related products that TB members are talking about. Clicking on a product will take you to TB’s partner, Primary, where you can find links to TB discussions about these products.

     
    Jun 18, 2021

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