can you mix rosin

Discussion in 'Bows and Rosin [DB]' started by PB+J, May 8, 2001.

  1. PB+J


    Mar 9, 2000
    arlington va
    Ok, possibly really dumb questio here, bracing myself for scorn.

    I'm a beginner with the bow. I was using Pops, thought it was ok. Switched to Kolstien all weather, liked the tone WAY more. Less "grunty," if that makes sense. Smoother, more subtle. But the kolstein's a little harder to work with, in that I'm more inclined to get wierd overtones and muffs. I could use just a shade or two more grip.

    Do people really mix rosin, or is this just a load of hooey whipped up to mock novices?

    Because I'd hate to have an explosion in my microwave
  2. It's unusual, but I've heard of people doing it. Have you tried simply taking a few more licks of the Kolstein than you would with Pops? I had a similar experience when I first tried Kolstein rosin after having used Carlsson for a long time. I liked the tone I produced with the Kolstein better, but Carlsson seemed to have a little more bite. So I just applied a little more, that's all. You might try Kolstein soft, the tone I get is better than with the all-weather, and it's a little stickier, which translates into bite.
  3. Jiffy+Polaner:
    You know you're not going to sacrifice tone for convenience, right? The stiffness of the Kolstein can be addressed two ways. First, by degree of hardness, as described by Special K. (And with summer arriving, the rosin you have may get softer.) But also, before applying any rosin, first do some bowing 'au natural' for a few minutes. The friction will warm up the bow hair a little, which will act on the rosin cake a bit, maybe enough to do the job.

    And it's not a dumb question.
  4. In chillier weather, below temps in the mid-50's or 60, I carry my rosin in my pocket. Which pocket depends on just how cold it is outside ;)
  5. Thanks for bringing this up, Mike... I had almost the exact same question...

    I also switched from Pops (sounded raspy, but bit instantly) to K all-weather.