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Can't find bridge spot on body, help?

Discussion in 'Hardware, Setup & Repair [BG]' started by nikolozj, Aug 13, 2012.


  1. nikolozj

    nikolozj

    Dec 15, 2011
    Hi TB!

    I recently put a new finish on my Ibanez Roadstar II bass and just now I realized that all of the screw spots (actually including pickguard as well.....) are covered and I don't know how to put the bridge back on!! :rolleyes:

    I also dont want to go and measure inch by inch where it's supposed to be and then take a drill and put a new holes right next to the old ones... I may mess up more.....

    I really don't know what to do... maybe sanding one particular spot and find at least one "guide" hole??

    :help:
     
  2. sharp8874

    sharp8874

    Jan 10, 2011
    Maybe if you pressed down hard enough you could feel where the holes were? But your best bet, IMO, would be to sand an area that will be covered up once the stuff is on again.
     
  3. Jools4001

    Jools4001 Supporting Member

    Well, you'll probably have to measure, but it shouldn't be hard.

    Find the centreline of the bass, find the centreline of the bridge line the two centrelines together. Put the G string saddle on the bridge most of the way forward (towards the nut) and measure off whatever scale length (I'm assuming 34") from the nut to the G string saddle. If your bridge is centred you should now have it somewhere in the right ballpark.

    Then, take a pin and push it gently through one of the mounting holes in the bridge...if the bridge is roughly in the right place and there is just a hole covered by paint underneath the bridge mounting hole then the pin should go through easily - if not you will have only made a small pin hole in part of the finish that will be hidden anyway.

    You may have to move the bridge marginally, but once your pin has located one hole you should be on the right track...once you've found two you're laughing
     
  4. nikolozj

    nikolozj

    Dec 15, 2011

    yeah, I guess it's 34...

    it's RB620

    [​IMG]

    Pin is a great idea! sounds more accurate than sanding... I'll try that. Thanks a lot. Another problem just popped up right now. Can't put back ground wire that goes from bridge to pots... Seems sanding sealer and paint got into hole... :( Why I didn't think of these things?!...... [​IMG]
     
  5. You could've put screws in the holes, then done the spray finish.
    Then all your holes are already marked and all you have to do is remove the screws.
     
  6. FunkMetalBass

    FunkMetalBass

    Aug 5, 2005
    Phoenix, Arizona 85029
    Endorsing Artist: J.C. Basses
    Measure from nut to 12th fret. That's half of the scale length.

    I'm 99.9% certain that your bass has a 34" scale.
     
  7. Get the G saddle in the correct spot. All else is easy.
     
  8. Zooberwerx

    Zooberwerx Gold Supporting Member

    Dec 21, 2002
    Virginia Beach, VA
    Here's a trick that works for finding nail heads in mudded and painted drywall...might work for your situation. Doesn't cost anything so it's worth a try.

    Take a small decent flashlight, turn it on, and lay it on its side on top of the bass with the beam passing over the estimated bridge location. I'll make the near-fatal assumption that the finish has settled a bit more where the mounting screws were located. If you crouch down and view the area crossways while slowly sweeping the beam, you may be able to make out very slight, yet consistently spaced dimples indicating a void beneath. It sometimes helps to dim the room lights during the process.

    Riis
     
  9. 96tbird

    96tbird PLEASE STAND BY Supporting Member

    Ooh, nice Riis! I just don't get how do much paint got on there to completely hide the holes; must be knuckle deep.
     
  10. Zooberwerx

    Zooberwerx Gold Supporting Member

    Dec 21, 2002
    Virginia Beach, VA
    LOL!! This really does work...sometimes...when I'm too lazy to dig out my stud finders. The trick is to run the flashlight parallel to the body as this discloses any number of imperfections. The OP may even be able to pick out the outline or silhouette of the original bridge.

    Riis
     
  11. nikolozj

    nikolozj

    Dec 15, 2011
    Thanks a lot guys!

    It's weird that the paint did hide all bridge holes, when most of pickguard holes are visible!

    I guess it must be uneven paint job, but the beam thing doesn't work at all. It's just completely covered....! :( I don't even know if pin method will work, because holes are probably full of sanding sealer and grain filler that I applied don't even remember how many times...... I've been working on this guitar for 5 months!!! I've been in painting hell and still am I guess.....
     
  12. 96tbird

    96tbird PLEASE STAND BY Supporting Member

    Ok, looks like you have to lay it out again. I hope you took the bridge off and put it away safely. So your G saddle should be very close to the 34" mark. Put the neck on line up the bridge on center, G saddle at 34" inches from the nut. Hold the bridge there and start exploring with a tiny drill bit to find a hole in the center.
     
  13. Zooberwerx

    Zooberwerx Gold Supporting Member

    Dec 21, 2002
    Virginia Beach, VA
    Dremel micro bits are great for this sort of stuff. Look at the bright side: even if the first half dozen drill sites turn up "dry", the failed attempts will be well-hidden by the bridge's baseplate.

    Sorry the flashlight trick didn't work.

    Riis
     
  14. Zooberwerx

    Zooberwerx Gold Supporting Member

    Dec 21, 2002
    Virginia Beach, VA
    Here's another far-fetched idea: post an "Ibanez Roadster II" thread under Basses...there must be another out there somewhere. Have the owner measure his from the pickup cavity to the leading edge of the bridge. These things are CNC cut so there should be little if any variation. This will set the appropriate distance. Unless something is way out of whack, the bridge is more than likely centered with the offset P pickup. A little geometric manipulation and painter's tape and you'll be closer than when you started.

    Riis
     

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