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Car speakers in a bass cab??

Discussion in 'Amps and Cabs [BG]' started by bass_drum, Jul 21, 2005.


  1. bass_drum

    bass_drum

    Feb 13, 2005
    Alberta,Canada
    Hey!

    I was chattign with my cousin the other day adn he said he put car speakers in a PA speaker when the speakers in it blew up. He told me that I should look into gettign car speakers for my 2x15" cab because its only 50 watts. Have yuou ever heard of/done this before?
     
  2. Selta

    Selta

    Feb 6, 2002
    Pacific Northwet
    Total fanboi of: Fractal Audio, AudiKinesis Cabs, Dingwall basses
    No offense dude, but do a search, as this is something that comes up almost monthly.... pretty much, it's a no go.

    -Ray
     
  3. Trevorus

    Trevorus

    Oct 18, 2002
    Urbana, IL
    Not worth the time. Problem is, they just don't have the proper frequency response to make a bass sound good.
     
  4. bass_drum

    bass_drum

    Feb 13, 2005
    Alberta,Canada
    even big subs wont do it?
     
  5. Selta

    Selta

    Feb 6, 2002
    Pacific Northwet
    Total fanboi of: Fractal Audio, AudiKinesis Cabs, Dingwall basses
    Big subs wont have the high frequencies like you need.

    -Ray
     
  6. Car speakers will work fine for bass cabs, as long as you play all your gigs in your car.

    Have to move a lot more air to fill a large room than the inside of a car.

    Randy
     
  7. Selta

    Selta

    Feb 6, 2002
    Pacific Northwet
    Total fanboi of: Fractal Audio, AudiKinesis Cabs, Dingwall basses
    How much air you're moving is the last problem to overcome, it's a simple matter of frequencies. A typical sub in a car doesn't go up much beyond a couple hundred HZ, whereas in a bass cab, we need something at LEAST around 16kHz to sound decent, and 20kHz to sound good. That's why bass guitar speakers are so difficult to make, as they need a WIDE array of frequencies, and volume they need to cover. This has been discussed before, a lot.

    -Ray
     
  8. MJ5150

    MJ5150 Terrific Twister

    Apr 12, 2001
    Lacey, WA
    Heck, go ahead and try it bro. Let us know how it sounds.

    -Mike
     
  9. dr_love2112

    dr_love2112

    May 28, 2005
    baytown texas
    well i have a 2x10, with car speakers and it has much deeper tone than my 4x10. it almost sounds like a 15 but no flabbyness that i get from a 15. so i run 2 pioneers (2x10) and a 4x10.
     
  10. The Clap

    The Clap

    Jan 5, 2004
    Scottsdale, AZ
    Well, no, he's right. No one is assuming a one-way speaker system, so using multiple drivers for full-range is the obvious solution. If we're just talking about car audio subwoofers though, then that's certainly a primary problem, but full-range frequency reproduction is a secondary concern when you can't hear the speaker at all over a drummer, which is what happens when you try to use car/home audio speakers.

    To the original poster, you CAN use car audio/home audio speakers, but Pro Audio isn't just another section at Guitar Center. A speaker that will fill your car with bass most likely won't do squat at a gig when we're talking 110db, 120db and higher sound pressure levels.
     
  11. no, no you didn't






























    get out
     
  12. BassIan

    BassIan Supporting Member

    Apr 27, 2003
    Cupertino, California
    To answer the question at hand, it is definitely POSSIBLE. By that, I mean you can put the car audio subwoofer into your cabinet, wire it up, perhaps that'll mean a "500W" cabinet instead of a "50W" cabinet. First problem: power rating of the cabinet doesn't tell you anything about how loud it is. Car audio subwoofers are not very sensitive (they don't put out as much volume "per watt" as a pro audio/bass cabinet driver. This is a VERY significant difference). You'd likely find the cabinet much more quiet than before. Secondly, the frequency response is too limited for the car audio subwoofer. The upper end of the frequency response doesn't usually exceed 200Hz or so... often for larger 15" and 18" drivers 100Hz is a stretch. These drivers are meant only for the lowest lows. Your average bass cabinet/PA bass driver will happily hit 1000-2000Hz, some go significantly higher. There IS a lot of important signal in those frequency ranges despite the fact that it is a "bass" guitar. Even if your cabinet has a tweeter to cover the top end, you'll have a serious gap in the frequency response.

    These are the two major problems you're likely to encounter. This would assume, of course, that the cabinet was designed for the driver you have in mind, which is not probable if you were planning on bolting the speaker into an existing cabinet. The cabinet has to be designed for the speaker's many complex parameters. A driver in a cabinet not designed for it will not perform well.

    Hopefully this makes some sense.
     
  13. Petebass

    Petebass

    Dec 22, 2002
    QLD Australia
    Home and Car Hi-Fi speakers suck for live music applications because they're too inefficient. And the subs give up at 300Hz of thereabouts. So not only won't you be able to get loud enough, you'll also sound like mud from lack of mids and highs.

    With existing loudspeaker technology, it's a case of Loud, Low, Small - pick any 2. If we use a 10" speaker as an example, a car sub is "small" and goes quite "low", so we have to sacrifice the "loud". 10" Bass guitar cabs are also small, don't go as low, so are therefore louder when fed the same number of watts.

    I can show ya the math if you like?
     
  14. bass_drum

    bass_drum

    Feb 13, 2005
    Alberta,Canada
    ya, i didnt think itd be a very good idea either, but I needed some proof to show to my cousin. Thanks!
     
  15. Hi,

    You are absolutely right in your comments about the frequency responce and efficiency of the typical car audio speakers, but there are exceptions. Look at this driver:

    http://www.oberton.com/Cone/10b100data.htm

    I think that four of these will do the job for not so loud and relatively compact bass guitar box.
     
  16. Petebass

    Petebass

    Dec 22, 2002
    QLD Australia
    OK lets do the math using this speaker. Ths issue I'm trying to address is the relative lack of loudness.

    The formula for SPL is:-

    SPL = (Log "Watts" x 10) + Sensitivity.

    For this driver, this translates to:-

    SPL = (Log100 x 10) +93.
    SPL = 113dB

    OK now lets look at a driver with typical live audio applications. For simplicity lets keep the wattage at 100, but increase the sensitivity to 96dB.

    SPL = (Log100 x 10) +96.
    SPL = 116dB

    That's an extra 3dB for the same number of watts. There is of course another way to get an extra 3dB - double your wattage. I'll prove it. Lets pretend that car audio speaker is 200W:-

    SPL = (Log200 x 10) +93.
    SPL = 116dB

    For reference, 93dB is actually on the "efficient" side for car audio. Lots of car audio speakers have sensitivity ratings in the high 80's. That said, pro audio drivers are common with sensitivities in the high 90's. That's a 10dB difference. What's the other way to get an extra 10dB - multiply your wattage by 10. So to achieve the same SPL, a typical car audio driver needs 10 times more watts that a typical pro audio driver, but they often have wattage ratings that are lower, so you're stuck.