Psst... Ready to join TalkBass and start posting, make new friends, sell your gear, and more?  Register your free account in 30 seconds.

Carl Thompson wooden bridges...

Discussion in 'Basses [BG]' started by Muttluk, Aug 7, 2001.


  1. I honestly didnt know where to put this.... so i'll let the moderators decided....

    i just saw this over at ctbasses.com...

    [​IMG]

    anyone know anythign about these? what type of sound would they put out? looks interesting as to how they'd work...
     
  2. brianrost

    brianrost Gold Supporting Member

    Apr 26, 2000
    Boston, Taxachusetts
    Maybe Les Claypool plays one, but a Carl Thompson bass is really designed more for a jazz player (Thompson himself is a jazz guitarist). Some CT models have wood nuts as well as bridges! The wood gives a rounder tone.

    Upright basses of course have had wooden bridges and nuts forever.
     
  3. RAM

    RAM

    May 10, 2000
    Chicago, IL
    I believe that Rob Allens also have wooden bridges. Their tone is so close to an upright in sound that it's scary:eek:
     
  4. How fragile are these? i'm aware that uprights have wooden bridges, but theres like metal mounting too, which the strings go thoguth, these its just on the wood.

    also...

    are these avalible on the open market? i'd be interested on one of these, i think i'd sound cool. i'm aware the the Carl thompson ones probly arnt, but those other brands you mentioned. Imagine, somone playing an electirc fretless, and scareing the crowd, because its sounds like an upright. got any links?
     
  5. RAM

    RAM

    May 10, 2000
    Chicago, IL
    I have no links to a Rob Allen bass sound, though there are a few Rob Allen owners around here that might. But, I know how nice they are from playing 'em! It's amazing to play and hear!:D

    I'm not 100% sure about this, but I believe that Rob Allen Bridges are made by the same guy who makes the rest of the instrument. In other words, I doubt you could buy one on the open market. But, you might be able to contact Rob Allen and see if he could part with one for a price.

    I believe that they're made out of Coco Bola, which is not a feeble wood. It should have some pretty stable characteristics, so I wouldn't worry about them falling apart on you.
     
  6. jasonbraatz

    jasonbraatz

    Oct 18, 2000
    Oakland, CA
    uprights have no metal reinforcement at the string slots...at least mine doesn't. Mine's rosewood, better basses use ebony. Not a wimpy wood.


    jason
     
  7. Angus

    Angus Supporting Member

    Apr 16, 2000
    Palo Alto, CA
    Rob Allen uses the same wood for the bridge as the fretboard. So for ebony fretboards, he uses ebony, for cocobola fretboards, same for the bridge, etc.

    I've never seen an upright with "metal string slots". I think maybe you're referring to the fine tuners you see on violins, etc?
     
  8. I think it may just be my high school's very cheep budget twords the jazz band (dispite all the festivals we win world wide...) It has a tailpiece which is quite simular to the ones found on guitars such as the gibson es series.
     
  9. rllefebv

    rllefebv

    Oct 17, 2000
    Newberg, Oregon
    While the Rob Allen has a wooden bridge body, the strings pass over a Corian saddle. The Thompson looks a little unique for production electric basses in that the strings pass over wooden saddles. If you look at Les' 6 string, the strings also pass over a wooden saddle, with the bridge resembling one from an archtop jazz guitar. The first bass that I ever built had that same type of bridge, single piece of maple. Worked great!

    I've often toyed with making a bridge like the one shown in the picture above... Now I'll have to build yet another bass to house it!!!


    -robert
     
  10. i have 2 ct's with wooden bridges. it's just a variation on a theme. they don't give you that metallic musicman bridge sound that's for sure, but they're pretty cool.
     
  11. brianrost

    brianrost Gold Supporting Member

    Apr 26, 2000
    Boston, Taxachusetts
    Guild basses in the 60s used wooden saddles on a metal bridge plate.