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Carvin PB200-15 Fuse Problem

Discussion in 'Amps and Cabs [BG]' started by dirk, Jul 15, 2001.


  1. dirk

    dirk

    Apr 6, 2000
    Memphis, TN
    Ok, Friday night I had to play an outdoor gig where I could barely hear myself b/c I had to run directly into the PA. Why, you ask? Because I blew 6 fuses, I repeat 6 fuses in my Carvin PB200. I blew the main fuse and the back and when I went to Radio Shack and got 4 replacements. Well, here was my problem in Radio Shack, the 2A Slow Blow fuses that it says to use where like twice the size of the blown fuse I had with me, but the 2A 250V Fast Acting fuse was exactly the same size. I guess I made the decision that I should get the one that looked just like the ones I blew. It was the wrong decision because I blew all of those fuses. Of course I didn't plug into the original power source that blew the first two, but what can I do. The fuses that they say to use are like twice as big the original fuses. Has anyone else experienced this problem? I need help, any amp techs out there?

    Dirk
     
  2. steinbergerxp2

    steinbergerxp2 Guest

    Jul 11, 2001
    I'm not sure what you mean by "size". Fuses are made in all sorts of ratings; Slo-Blo fuses take an overload longer before sacificing themselves; Fast-Blo (normal) fuses die easilywhen they get a surge.

    In addition, they are made in different packages; the most common (older) style in the US is an inline package with a glass cylinder and metal ends, about 1.2" long. There are also similar construction fuses about .6" long (commonly referred to as automotive fuses). There are also other types of automotive fuses.

    You SHOULD use the same rating of fuse the manufacturer of your amp recommend (including slow/fast).

    You have NO CHOICE but to use the type of fuse package that fits in the fuse holder.

    If you are using the "right" fuse and a commercial power source you know to be good, and you blow fuses, you have an amp problem.
     
  3. rickbass

    rickbass Supporting Member

    IME, if you're going through fuses like potato chips, you have a short somewhere and fuse size doesn't matter.
     
  4. dirk

    dirk

    Apr 6, 2000
    Memphis, TN
    I'm sure now it's an amp problem. I found right size 2A slow blow fuses today and I blew two of them in my room (no problem w/ the power source there). So into the shop it goes. Maybe it won't take too long... I hate being without my equipment.

    Dirk
     
  5. As a bit of general information, you can often get some clues as to the possible seriousness of the problem by looking into the fuse, assuming it's got a glass body of course.

    If the inside of the fuse is blackened then there's usually a pretty sreious fault and putting more fuses in won't make the thing work. If a fuse isn't blackened inside, often it's just the fuse that's got tired of living and replacing it makes the thing work again.

    If it's the mains input fuse - which are usually semi delay types - the fault will probably be in the mains side. For example, transformer shorted turn, bridge rectifier with one or more diodes shorted or a faulty smoothing cap. Speaker fuse failure usually means the amp is faulty, either in the high current side itself or some other component that's driving / allowing the high current side to do something it's not supposed to.

    Obviously that repair people will fix it for you.

    Rockin John
     
  6. dirk

    dirk

    Apr 6, 2000
    Memphis, TN
    Since my amp is only a year and 3 days old I called Carvin and they said to go ahead and send it to them. This sucks b/c I've heard they take a really long time... I'll probably have enough for a new amp by the time I get it back.. Oh well, so is life.

    Dirk