Cascading the Channels on an Alembic F-2B???

Discussion in 'Amps and Cabs [BG]' started by jokerjkny, Dec 26, 2004.

  1. jokerjkny


    Jan 19, 2002
    NY / NJ / PA
    i saw this on the alembic site for their stereo version of the venerable F-1X, and thought, pretty cool:

    anyone own an F-2B and try this? while the overdrive feature is nice, i'm sure you could get a righteously sick tubey glow with the gentlest of settings.

    also, a more general question, but how does the 2B differ from the 1X, tonally?
  2. geshel


    Oct 2, 2001
    I've tried it, briefly. It produced a very fat, farty old-school overdrive unless I had the first gain down almost all the way. It wasn't the overdrive I was looking for, so I didn't play with it much that way.

    An active bass with a hot output is enough to get one channel into more of that "warm just barely overdriven" zone. I use the extra 10dB gain available from the SF-2 for that on one channel.

    I'm not sure, but I think the F-1X is the same exact circuit except for the "deep" switch. I don't have any direct experience, so I'm not sure the effect it has. I know I can get plenty of bass out of the F-2B, though I'm guessing the Deep switch is tuned lower than the bass knob is. (similar to the fact that the Bright switch brings in higher frequencies than the treble knob affects).
  3. IvanMike

    IvanMike Player Characters fear me... Staff Member Supporting Member

    Nov 10, 2002
    Middletown CT, USA
    no experience with cascading the f2-b's channels. the f2-b is exaclty the same circuit as the the f1-x without the deep switch. it's the classic fender tone stack taken from the rca manual .The deep switch changes the value of a capacitor in the bass control, but IME, it also changes the way the other controls work as well. Deep sounds pretty neat, but overall i found myself prefering the non-deep setting on my f1-x. The bright swtich operates completly differently than the deep does. it just shunts all treble past a certain freq past the volume knob right to the output. the higher you turn up the volume, the less pronounced it gets.