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Casters or Feet vs. None

Discussion in 'Amps and Cabs [BG]' started by unbridled, Feb 18, 2018.


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  1. unbridled

    unbridled

    May 26, 2005
    Montana
    Endorsing Artist-Compton Compensated Custom Bridges (for Gretsch 6ers)
    I've always wondered if casters or rubber feet on cabs can be a bad thing sometimes. I have had experiences in the past, especially at venues where I was at floor level or the stages were really solid, that my old bass cabinets coupled with the floor, producing great tone. I also didn't have to turn up as much to be heard.

    On occasion, I D.J. events (don't hate me) and I will sometimes pull the rubber legs off my subs to see how it sounds. Unless there are things rattling on the walls, it usually sounds better, but those are the ultra low frequencies.

    I wish the casters on my new cab were easier to remove because I'd try to experiment a bit. I wonder if I'd find it sounds better without them or not.

    Discuss...
     
  2. blubass

    blubass

    Aug 3, 2007
    Modesto Ca
    Current: Blackstar, DR strings, Nady. Previous endorsements with: GK, Rotosound, Ernie Ball, Cleartone, EMG, Dean, Dava Picks, Rebel Straps, Dickies
    Why not just turn your sub or cab on its side. Unless there's a mechanical restriction keeping it upright it's the easiest solution. Mounting casters on the side of a cab, or attaching Velcro to the cab, then building a dolly with the accompanying Velcro would make an easy mobile but removable solution as well.

    I've had both good and bad experiences with coupling on the floor. There's a lot of variables to consider as to whether one or the other is better.
     
    pcake, Coolhandjjl, JRA and 1 other person like this.
  3. Jeff Scott

    Jeff Scott Rickenbacker guru.......... Supporting Member

    Apr 11, 2006
    Rubber feet.

    Rubber Feet.
     
  4. Korladis

    Korladis Banned Supporting Member

    It doesn't matter really. Unless your cab is really poorly braced and wasting energy through shaking, the coupling with the floor is acoustic in nature and a couple inches aren't going to make a difference.
     
  5. jnewmark

    jnewmark Just wanna play the groove. Supporting Member

    Aug 31, 2006
    Stax 1966
    Third St. Cigar Records staff musician.
    Never have taken the feet off my cabs. Use casters on any cab that has 212's or bigger. Always raise my cabs.
     
  6. Due to the fact that I am both old and lazy , all my cabs have wheels on them.:thumbsup:
     
  7. unbridled

    unbridled

    May 26, 2005
    Montana
    Endorsing Artist-Compton Compensated Custom Bridges (for Gretsch 6ers)
    I am too. I have a real nice cart for the gear that doesn't have wheels. I charge a bit extra for my DJ gigs in places that have steps. (Seriously)
     
    Bassbeater and JRA like this.

  8. I guess I have been pretty lucky. In the last two years , we have only played two gigs where there were any steps. Both at the same place with five wide concrete steps. Heck , I was able to get my 8 10 in and out both times by myself , just took a bit of time. The last time one of the guitar players felt sorry for me and grabbed the bottom of the cab for the last four steps going out. If I could charge extra for steps , I would.
     
  9. unbridled

    unbridled

    May 26, 2005
    Montana
    Endorsing Artist-Compton Compensated Custom Bridges (for Gretsch 6ers)
    The secret is not letting them know they are getting charged extra...
     
    JRA likes this.
  10. JRA

    JRA my words = opinion Supporting Member

    on coupling: may or may not be of benefit...i'm afraid "it depends." :)

    on casters vs feet: i can't deny that wheels are great, but i vote 'feet' for the majority of stages: less rattle and roll, IME. ;)

    on charging extra for steps: good for you! :thumbsup:
     
    unbridled and Coolhandjjl like this.
  11. agedhorse

    agedhorse Supporting Member Commercial User

    Feb 12, 2006
    Davis, CA (USA)
    Development Engineer-Mesa, Product Support-Genz Benz
    The difference in acoustic coupling is about zero, but mechanical coupling might make a difference in how a wood stage diaphragm might resonate and/or rattle. The more solid the stage, the lower the mechanical coupling and energy transfer.
     
    Korladis, unbridled, blubass and 2 others like this.
  12. micguy

    micguy

    May 17, 2011
    I always epoxy my cabs to the floor to maximize mechanical coupling. I go through a lot of cabs that way, but when I play a place for the second time, I don't have to bring a cab - it's already there.
     
  13. Coolhandjjl

    Coolhandjjl

    Oct 13, 2010
    Appleton
    To break the 'acoustic coupling', you'd have to go up a foot and a half or so to notice a difference.
     
  14. Bassbeater

    Bassbeater Guest

    Sep 9, 2001
    I use casters on stage gear bc it's too convenient not to.
    I use short furniture feet on my recording cab, because they have no moving parts.
    If your casters are rattling and you don't want to replace them yet, you can bring a small rug for the stage to make the cab sit better.
     
    unbridled likes this.
  15. Spidey2112

    Spidey2112

    Aug 3, 2016
    :cool:... :rollno:...
     
  16. unbridled

    unbridled

    May 26, 2005
    Montana
    Endorsing Artist-Compton Compensated Custom Bridges (for Gretsch 6ers)
    Good info.

    So, those home stereo and computer subs that have downward firing drivers basically don't do much unless your house isn't built that sturdy? (Not being a smarta**. I really want to know.)

    Also, so the times I've had "good" coupling, it's probably mostly been acoustic in nature? I just have always thought there was more of an element of mechanical coupling. An example is knocking plates off of the wall like I did when I brought my HD 15 cab home.
     
    Last edited: Feb 20, 2018
  17. agedhorse

    agedhorse Supporting Member Commercial User

    Feb 12, 2006
    Davis, CA (USA)
    Development Engineer-Mesa, Product Support-Genz Benz
    No, downward firing subs can work just fine, but may cause objectionable resonances due to acoustic coupling in a poorly framed (wood) floor which wouldn't occur in slab on grade construction.
     
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