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Certain modes for certain music genres?

Discussion in 'General Instruction [BG]' started by btrag, Sep 12, 2005.


  1. btrag

    btrag

    Mar 7, 2005
    Chicago
    In my instruction book, it states: "the Dorian and Mixolydian modes are very popular in blues and funk music." Is that true?

    I also read that the Phygian (sp?) mode is very popular in heavy metal. True?

    What are the most popular applications for each mode?
     
  2. pontz

    pontz

    Oct 31, 2003
    CT
    Very True!

    I also read that the Phygian (sp?) mode is very popular in heavy metal. True? [/QUOTE]

    Not sure.

    What are the most popular applications for each mode?[/QUOTE]

    What do you mean? You want to know where the other modes are commonly used?
     
  3. JimmyM

    JimmyM Supporting Member

    Apr 11, 2005
    Apopka, FL
    Endorsing: Ampeg Amps, EMG Pickups
    Phrygian and locrian are often used in metal and some foreign styles like Arabic.

    Ionian, dorian, lydian and mixolydian are common in most pop music like blues, folk, rock, funk, etc.

    Aeolian is used usually over minor chords and changes and isn't really specific to any genre.

    All the modes are used in jazz.
     
  4. btrag

    btrag

    Mar 7, 2005
    Chicago
    I am resurrecting this thread, due to new seemingly contradictory information that I read. In my book, it states that each mode should only be played over it's respective chord in the key of the song. So, in the key of E, you would play:

    Ionian mode over an E chord
    Dorian mode over a F#
    Phygian over a G#
    Lydian over a A
    Mixolydian over an B
    Aolian over a C#
    Locrian D#

    Correct? Will this work in all musical contexts? Anything I'm not accounting for?
     
  5. Generally, the most effective use of modes is to use them for their distinctive sound and not try to shift with every chord. I would never try to change mode as your book describes.
     
  6. Sure it works in all musical contexts, but musically speaking, I don't think there's a point to playing each mode over it's respective chord in the key of the song. For instance, in the key of C, if you were to play an Ionian mode over a C chord(I chord), or a Lydian mode over a F chord(IV chord), or even a Mixolydian over G(V chord), you are still/only playing notes within the C major scale.

    However, I think this method you mentioned, comes in handy in certain situations. If you were to memorize the finger patterns for each mode, you could move all over the fret board without thinking or worrying if the notes you're playing are out key. I think this comes in handy in a jam setting.

    I agree with the guy above me that the effective use of modes is to use them for their distinctive sound, to perhaps venture out of the key signature. Instead of playing an Ionian mode over a C chord(in the key of C), try using the other modes.
     
  7. ii-v

    ii-v

    Mar 27, 2005
    SLC, UT
    This pertains more to the resurrected part of the thread.

    Over Major chords- Lydian, Ionian
    Over Minor chords- Dorian, Aeolian, Phrygian, Locrian
    Over Dominant chords- Mixolydian

    This is a very rudimentary approach and a solid place to begin.