chambered thunderbird

Discussion in 'Luthier's Corner' started by poomwah, Feb 19, 2010.


  1. poomwah

    poomwah

    Jan 26, 2008
    Didn't want to hijack, so I will start a new thread.
    I'm going to build a thunderbird, and just to be different I'm going to build it about half inch or so thicker and hollow out the wings. I haven't decided on the shape or placement of the ports yet, how big do they need to be?
    Would the bass benefit from having an acoustic style pickup instead of the humbuckers?
     
  2. i can tell you this.. you're going to exacerbate the neck dive quite a bit.
     
  3. Hi.

    IMLE hollowing out a solid body instrument for the purpose of added acoustic volume often creates more problems than it "solves".

    Helmholz resonator chambers won't work with such a small internal volume that You can squeeze out of a solid body of an instrument. At least not with the frequencies You most probably are after.

    I have a hollowed out lower wing on my Epi, but that's for other reasons ;).

    Regards
    Sam
     
  4. poomwah

    poomwah

    Jan 26, 2008
    Thanks guys, I'm not worried about neck dive, maybe its my strap, maybe its where I put my strap buttons, but I've never had an issue with neck dive.
    T-Bird, out of curiosity, why is yours chambered?

    I didn't know if it would be a good idea or not, but thought it would definitely be interesting
     
  5. poomwah

    poomwah

    Jan 26, 2008
    Thanks guys, I'm not worried about neck dive, maybe its my strap, maybe its where I put my strap buttons, but I've never had an issue with neck dive.
    T-Bird, out of curiosity, why is yours chambered?

    I didn't know if it would be a good idea or not, but thought it would definitely be interesting
     
  6. Hi.

    Reason #1, I had the body in a milling machine for a Model One anyway, and having a cavity like that never hurts anything.

    Reason #2, It was the easiest way to have the switch and the wires go in neatly.

    Reason #3, I have an idea for an active module that may sometime in the future find a test bed in there.

    As the rule is no pic, no...

    Elektroniikkatasku.jpg

    Regards
    Sam
     
  7. the most important reason to hollow a solid body out is for tone and weight, I think we can all get behind that.
    The tonal advantages are very very subjective. There are some luthiers that claim that depending on pick ups you choose can totally eclipse any structural mod you end up doing. The largest improvement I've found in chambering your bass is a focusing of the lower midrange. Though material choice can drastically change that as well.
    With a body as large as a thunderbird, it may be a nesesity to drop the ole lbs. Over lightening the body can bring about....
    Neck dive is something that plagues any P bass or gibson player. The key is neck material and tuning machine weight. I have built 2 P bass copies and both have laminated mahogany necks w/ bubbinga spines. The lighter of the 2 has a pellonia core w/ a douglas fir top and back and weighs only 7.5 lbs. ZERO NECK DIVE!
    In short, there is no wrong no right. Just experiment. keep it light, keep it strong.

    keep those hands deep in the pocket. peace.
     
  8. Primary

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