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Cheap Double BAss?

Discussion in 'Basses [DB]' started by bassist15, Mar 20, 2006.


  1. bassist15

    bassist15

    Mar 6, 2006
    Indiana
    Ive played electric for a little under 2 years. Ive always been fascinated by the Double BAss. Ive played one once. I love the sound. I was wondering what the least costing Double bass out there is .
     
  2. Read all the "Newbie" threads until your eyes are sore . . then go for it, you'll love it, it's a way of life . . . . :smug:
     
  3. fish slapper

    fish slapper

    Nov 17, 2005
    Tigard, OR
    As stated many times here, buying the cheapest thing you can find will bring nothing but heart ache. I was where you are now about a year ago. Top 5 things I learned from here:

    1. Get a teacher.
    2. Rent until you can figure out what you need.
    3. Get a teacher.
    4. Be prepared to eat humble pie, even after 30 years of playing electric the UB was a totally new instrument.
    5. Get a teacher.

    That about sums it up.

    Mark
     
  4. There is no such thing as the "Fender Squier" of DB's. Be prepared to spend at least 4 figures in U$D. Oh, and by the way, get a teacher and a bow. I saw Chis Wood last Thursday night. He was switching from pluck to bow in the same measure. You learn so much more using a bow for your lessons. Chris was using a German bow. That's the underhanded one with the deep frog.
     
  5. hdiddy

    hdiddy Official Forum Flunkee Supporting Member

    Mar 16, 2004
    San Francisco, CA
    Hmm... couldn't you say that Engleharts are the Squires of the DB world and anything else that's cheaper is simply a department store toy? All things being relative that is. :)
     
  6. fish slapper

    fish slapper

    Nov 17, 2005
    Tigard, OR
    If you don't get a teacher who tells you that you need a bow, find another teacher. Adds to the birthing pains but the best way to work on intonation. Even if you only plan on playing jazz or bluegrass, a bit of classical training will help a ton.