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Chord Theory

Discussion in 'Ask Anthony Wellington [archive]' started by bigbottom81, May 18, 2014.


  1. bigbottom81

    bigbottom81

    Sep 24, 2011
    Hi Anthony,

    I'm an experienced touring and session player, mainly country and gospel styles. I've recently started branching out on my techniques particularly chords and chord theory. I know this is an area where you are a master, so I pose my question. I haven't been able to find much on chord shapes and theory for bass guitar. Where would you recommend I look in order to expand my knowledge? Is there any products/courses that you have available or a direction you could point me in?

    Thanks so much!
    Corey
     
  2. remcult

    remcult Supporting Member

    Dec 26, 2012
    New Jersey
    I'm sure Ant will have much better answers, but I have a few suggestions for resources: for chord tones, Jeff Berlin had a great book. Damian Erskine recently released a book that walks you through arpeggios, inversions, and chord shapes for different stringed basses.

    Finally, look at Scott Devine's online videos. He teaches theory fairly well
     
  3. bigbottom81

    bigbottom81

    Sep 24, 2011
    I've been learning some things from Scott as far as modes and scales, but the way Anthony explains and plays this stuff, nobody comes close. I'll definitely check out these courses! Thanks so much for the reply
     
  4. Ant Wellington

    Ant Wellington

    Jan 4, 2011
    Maryland
    Yo BB,

    I think the others who were mentioned may be better for you. For me,…there is NO such thing as theory for bass. I think that the whole 'bass theory' thing is part of the problem. And it's very limiting.

    I wouldn't teach you shapes and then call it theory like what others would probably do. I'd teach you theory and show you that shapes are a 'by-product' of the theory. There's a huge difference between the two. The electric bass is only 63 years old. A CMaj7 is hundreds and hundreds of years old.

    What makes a chord a chord isn't the shape. It's the distance(interval) between the note. I prefer to teach that. When bass players start moving shapes around they usually do it at the expense of not knowing what notes they are playing.

    I've found that people who only think of arpeggios as shapes never play the 3rd below the root. That was a staple of Jamerson's playing.

    Buy a great theory book. Not a bass theory book,…there's no such thing. Then learn what chords actually are. It'll help you more in the long run.

    peace,
    anthony
     
  5. bigbottom81

    bigbottom81

    Sep 24, 2011
    And that is precisely why I asked your advice sir! I guess my question was more of where to learn about voicing and creating chords for bass vs shapes...I realize shapes are a by product of chord structure. Thanks so much much for the reply and the sound advice

    Corey
     
  6. Ant Wellington

    Ant Wellington

    Jan 4, 2011
    Maryland
    Then I can help you with that.
     
  7. bigbottom81

    bigbottom81

    Sep 24, 2011
    How would recommend I go about finding study outlets for theory? Do you have any products for this or who would you recommend?
     
  8. Ant Wellington

    Ant Wellington

    Jan 4, 2011
    Maryland
    I don't check other teacher's curriculums. I'm just too busy with mine.

    I have my own school. Everyone knows that. If someone wants to study with me
    they contact me privately.

    If someone wants to study with another teacher they should contact them.

    But they shouldn't expect a teacher to know another teacher's curriculum..

    All I can do is offer up what I do. Unlike other teachers, I won't say that I'm
    the best, independently of how I feel. I actually recommend that people study
    with other teachers before they study with me. I'm confident in my curriculum so
    therefore I don't feel a need to tout what I do. Look around and see what is the
    best curriculum for you.

    Make a decision based on research,...not what the teacher says.

    But be sure what it is that you want to learn. And be sure that you understand the difference between being taught and being shown something. There's a HUGE difference between the two. But only if you want to see it. Learning a lick or shaper isn't the same as learning theory.

    Contact me if you ant to take private lessons. If you want to study with another teacher you should contact them.

    But always remember,


    One lesson with a great teacher could change your playing forever.

    peace,
    anthony
     
  9. Docbass1218

    Docbass1218 Supporting Member

    Jan 15, 2012
    southern New Jersey
    Hey BigBottom,

    Ant's an unbelievable teacher. I study with him. You will get what you're looking for, and tons more. I can't urge any more strongly that if you are serious, truly serious, about learning, check him out. You will be amazed. As great a player as he is, he is an even greater teacher. Best of luck.
     
    jmac likes this.
  10. Ant Wellington

    Ant Wellington

    Jan 4, 2011
    Maryland
    Thanks,...whoever you are!
    -aw
     
  11. bigbottom81

    bigbottom81

    Sep 24, 2011
    Thanks so much Doc for the advice! My apologies for my ignorance Anthony, but I was unaware that you had your own school. I won't, however, stay ignorant and will probably be contacting to about some private tutoring. Thanks

    Corey
     
  12. Ant Wellington

    Ant Wellington

    Jan 4, 2011
    Maryland
    bigbottom81 and remcult like this.
  13. Richard Ford

    Richard Ford

    Mar 1, 2015
    Good day sir, I would like to know more about your lessons and pricing
     
  14. GastonD

    GastonD

    Nov 18, 2013
    Belgrade, Serbia
    Hey Ant,
    Since you mentioned you are too busy with your own curriculum for having time to check other people's ones, do you use any textbook or publicly available handbook for teaching any aspects of that curriculum? Or you have some sort of handouts made yourself for that purpose?
    I ain't trying to get a peek into your stuff while circumventing the man behind it, it was more a question out of curiosity, just to see what is the general view you have of how some universal musical principles are formulated and presented.
     
  15. slapfunk987

    slapfunk987

    Feb 8, 2011

    This link that I posted has all the books Anthony Wellington uses.. Check them out.
    His main books tend to be "Harmony and Theory" and "Edlys Guide To Music Theory For Practical People"...

    Bassology Lessons - Anthony Wellington
     
    GastonD likes this.
  16. slapfunk987

    slapfunk987

    Feb 8, 2011
    Oh and if you join Scottsbasslessons.com, you will see that Scott has a Chord Theory Course that I believe is 4 hours long. Very in depth and takes you through most of the chord shapes you will need to learn.

    Anthony teaches the theory behind the shapes which is good but can be a slow learning process, but better in the long run. Scott teaches the shapes directly to get things moving. I recommend using Scott's approach to learn the shapes and then MAKE SURE you go see Anthony to gain an understanding of what your doing. Otherwise you're just learning shapes.