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Chords or single notes

Discussion in 'Technique [BG]' started by rock bassist 81, Jul 19, 2002.


  1. I was wondering if i should chord your bass or just use single notes on songs. I play classic rock (Van Halen etc.) Right now i use both and it sounds pretty good.:confused:
     
  2. stroggnoy

    stroggnoy Guest

    Jul 11, 2002
    I would prefer that you left my bass alone, thanks ;)
     
  3. What exactly do you mean?
     
  4. kaboom133

    kaboom133

    Oct 19, 2001
    Latrobe PA
    I was wondering if I should chord your bass or just use single notes on songs


    that's what was meant
     
  5. oh S#%@ massive typo!!! damn
     
  6. kaboom133

    kaboom133

    Oct 19, 2001
    Latrobe PA
    and to answer your question, i do use chords in my playing as often as i can. they're a lot of fun, and they can confuse non bassists... "what's he doing, does he think that's a guitar or something?" :D
     
  7. yeah, i like the sound a lot :D do you use bar chords, power chords or what?
     
  8. Jeff Moote

    Jeff Moote Supporting Member

    Oct 11, 2001
    Beamsville, ON, Canada

    :rolleyes:What he's saying, is that your grammar sucks, a lot. Aside from that, he is joking.;) :p
     
  9. kaboom133

    kaboom133

    Oct 19, 2001
    Latrobe PA
    *hides in shame* i use power chords, but hey, it works, it sounds cool, and that's all i know about so it's all good.
     
  10. do you use 2 or 3 strings on your power chords? I've found that if you use one more finger on the next highest string, it adds incredibly...;)
     
  11. kaboom133

    kaboom133

    Oct 19, 2001
    Latrobe PA
    all depends, i started out useing just 2, but i've recently started useing 3, and i see what you mean, it does add soemthing extra. it all depends on the song and what kind of sound i want.
     
  12. Jeff Moote

    Jeff Moote Supporting Member

    Oct 11, 2001
    Beamsville, ON, Canada
    Do you folks know anything about what you're doing? You should learn more about chords and ways of voicing them, which ones to use where, what to play over what change, etc. if you are truly interested.

    Triads are a good place to start, so learn to play them in all 3 inversions, in any position. Then you have a start on chords. "Power chords" are hardly chords, especially since even voiced w/3 notes, 2 are octaves and thus it is a double-stop + an octave.
     
  13. kaboom133

    kaboom133

    Oct 19, 2001
    Latrobe PA
    well, actually, i'm suffering here. i have no way of learning all of this stuff, but i would love to. there's no bass teachers that i can find around me. i live to far away from everything. so, i'm stuck sucking, and having no real knowledge of any of this. do you know anywhere where i could learn this?
     
  14. kaboom133

    kaboom133

    Oct 19, 2001
    Latrobe PA
    so to answer your question, no i have no idea of what i'm doing, everything i know i tought myself, and so i have not a clue as to what i'm doing.
     
  15. No offense Monty, but power chords are still chords. (even if they're only a double stop with an octave... i believe the minimum number of tones for a chord is 2... let them walk before they run:) )

    Kaboom, here's a cool trick to try if you're into simple chords:D
    Learn your scales. Take the 1st note and the 3rd note of your major, and play that as you would your power chords. Try it on just two strings at first. When you get the hand strength built up a little, throw the octave in for fullness.
    For you tab-only folks and beginners, let me explain what I mean. Assuming you're in standard tuning, fret your E string at the 5th fret with your middle finger and fret your A string at the 4th fret with your index finger. Playing those two notes gives you a simple A chord. If you want to try the full A chord with the 5th in there, fret the E string at the 5th fret again using your index this time, fret the A string at the 7th fret using your ring finger, and fret the G string at the 6th fret using your middle finger. If you strum those strings (while muting/choking the D string), you get a nice, full sounding A chord. Try this out. You may find more uses with this than your standard power chord.

    Remember... learn your scales!!! It will help you "find/discover" other chords, like minors and 7ths.
     
  16. Jeff Moote

    Jeff Moote Supporting Member

    Oct 11, 2001
    Beamsville, ON, Canada
    Well, this has been argued to no end, but most dictionaries/theory books say 3. I take no offence, and understand what you mean.

    This is good advice, but at any cost a good teacher is worth it. It is impossible to see what a teacher can do for you without experiencing it. If you have to travel for an hour once a week to get lessons, I'd say it's worthwhile.
     
  17. Turock

    Turock Supporting Member

    Apr 30, 2000
    Melnibone
    No offense Bass Mule, but two notes is a double-stop. The simplest chord is a triad (three notes).
     
  18. My mistake guys. I actually went and looked it up. Yes, I'm a nerd. AND I'll admit when I'm wrong. 3 notes to a chord. My bad.:rolleyes:




    Cool though... another Berry Oakley fan! :cool:
     
  19. Turock

    Turock Supporting Member

    Apr 30, 2000
    Melnibone
    As helpful as you were being to those guys, I figured you wouldn't want to spread bad information.
    Oh yeah, let me be the first to welcome you to TalkBass. Lots of knowledgeable folks here. Enjoy your stay.
     
  20. jazzbo

    jazzbo

    Aug 25, 2000
    San Francisco, CA
    Hi Grammar Nazi!

    I would prefer that you left...??!?!?

    Tsk tsk tsk.

    I would prefer that you leave my bass alone.....

    - regardless, it was hilarious.