chrome p'up covers...

Discussion in 'Miscellaneous [BG]' started by Jeff2287, Jun 26, 2003.

  1. Jeff2287


    May 4, 2002
    Hello. Y'know those silver pick-up covers like you see on old, vintage Fender basses? Well, what exactly are they for? Do they serve any real purpose?

  2. The bridge pickup cover always used to have foam mutes underneath it to stop any open strings ringing. I'm not sure if they are still fitted on re issues though.

    The neck pickup cover, well, I'm not too sure what the real purpose of that is, apart from looking damn cool, I'm sure someone else will know.

    Hope that kinda helps :meh:
  3. old_skool


    Aug 17, 2000
    Milwaukee, WI
    You could try a search here for ash trays.

    Aside from the mute I believe they were also used for cosmetic reasons. Pups werent considered the most attractive thing ever then.
  4. Ben Mishler

    Ben Mishler

    Jan 22, 2003
    San Jose
    The main reason I like my neck pickup cover is when my guitarist picks up and "plays" my bass, he no longer scratches the pickup with his sloppy pickwork. I don't care if he plays it, but I do care when he scratches it.
  5. incognito89x

    incognito89x ♪♫♪ ♪ ♪ ♫&#983

    Sep 22, 2002
    Royal Oak, Michigan
    The Neck was originally a hand rest because it was thought to be played with a thumb. Same with the finger rest on the G string side of some of the older designs and re-issues.
  6. Jeff2287


    May 4, 2002
    THANK YOU incognito89x! I've always wondered why the rest was on that side!

  7. P. Aaron

    P. Aaron Supporting Member

    I put chrome on mine because it was generic when I bought it but, I wanted that "vintage" look for the cover band I'm in.
    Plus it just looks great to me. Everytime I look at it, I want to play it.

    Yes it does sound and feel great.
  8. Brendan


    Jun 18, 2000
    Austin, TX
    I thought they were also involved in grounding in the early J models... or something, I might be imagining I heard something.
  9. Tsal


    Jan 28, 2000
    Finland, EU
    That's right. Well, perhaps not really for grounding, but the pickups were connected to the covers - same thing with Rickenbacker covers, I believe.
  10. Where can one obtain said pickup covers?
  11. FretNoMore

    FretNoMore * Cooking with GAS *

    Jan 25, 2002
    The frozen north
    I tend to plant my thumb on the end of the neck pickup, muting the B/E string at the same time.

    I've been wondering where you play the strings on a bass with ashtrays, do you play between the 'trays or between the neck and the neck pickup? Or both? And where do you plant your thumb?
  12. Brooks


    Apr 4, 2000
    Middle East
    I got mine from They also pop up on eBay from time to time, and I have also seen them at from time to time - drop Michael an email, he might be able to get them.
  13. Phat Ham

    Phat Ham

    Feb 13, 2000
    I think it was more for shielding than grounding, though it's not all that effective.
  14. embellisher

    embellisher Holy Ghost filled Bass Player Staff Member Supporting Member

    Yes, they were for shielding, on the original single coil P bass. As you said, not very effective.
  15. embellisher

    embellisher Holy Ghost filled Bass Player Staff Member Supporting Member

    Also, in the USA, has them cheaper than anybody else.
  16. P. Aaron

    P. Aaron Supporting Member

    If you have a "guitar store" near you that sells used gear, They may be able to help.

    I got my chrome covers at "Junkyard Guitars" in Royal Oak. They both cost me less than 20 Bucks. Both are from Fender. Though I also had Guitar Center trying to get them for me and they failed. Go figure, with the volume they do, you'd think they'd have that kinda stuff layin' around, but nooooo.

    Had to order the tortiseshell pickguard from
  17. Ben Mishler

    Ben Mishler

    Jan 22, 2003
    San Jose
    You can play whever you want. I play in both places. I put my thumb on the side of the neck when I play above, and I put in on the cover when I play below it. Where you play is determined by the sound you want.