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Cirrus5 or Tobias Basic5

Discussion in 'Basses [BG]' started by jensskov, Aug 30, 2001.


  1. jensskov

    jensskov

    Aug 30, 2001
    I'm trying to decide if I want to buy a Cirrus 5 og at Tobias Basic 5 (at +$500) but I can't make up my mind.

    Could anyone give me some hints and experiences?
     
  2. Bruce Lindfield

    Bruce Lindfield Unprofessional TalkBass Contributor Gold Supporting Member

    I think that for anyone to be able to help, you will need to give more information on the Tobias - in particular, when was it made or a serial number if you are unsure.

    The hand-made pre-Gibson Basics are some of the best basses around, but more recent models have variable quality.
     
  3. jensskov

    jensskov

    Aug 30, 2001
    It's from '98 and made of zebrawood and with bartolini pu's and electronics.
     
  4. Phil Smith

    Phil Smith Mr Sumisu 2 U

    May 30, 2000
    Peoples Republic of Brooklyn
    Creator of: iGigBook for Android/iOS
    Ultimately it's going to come down to the sound, fit and finish. The Basic 5 is going to be a higher quality bass because of the material, craftmanship and electronics that goes into it even though it's from the Gibson era. Note also that even though the bass is from the Gibson era it's still hand made. The woods used on both basses are going affect how they sound. The Cirrus is 35" scale which is going to make a bit of a difference. But again I stress, it depends on whether or not the fit of the bass (assuming both are set up to your playing specifications) to you and the sound of the bass is what you like and what you want. This sometimes takes weeks or months to determine this and more often than not you don't have that much time to make a decision.
     
  5. uglybassplayer

    uglybassplayer

    Aug 24, 2001
    New Jersey
    Phil's right! Both are great basses. The Tobias most likely will have a better resale value (if that matters to you). I just picked up a Redwood/Alder Cirrus fiver that I love (every one I've talked to that owns one seems to love theirs as well, just check the Cirrus threads here on Talkbass), but ultimately you should try out both with your rig and see what feels and sounds best for you.

    - Frank
     
  6. says who? I say if you have tried them both out extensively, get the one you think is best. They are both excellent basses.....

    Mark
     
  7. Phil Smith

    Phil Smith Mr Sumisu 2 U

    May 30, 2000
    Peoples Republic of Brooklyn
    Creator of: iGigBook for Android/iOS
    Guess what Mark? That's exactly what I told him. Additionally the Basic 5 is going to be of higher quality because of the reasons I've listed which is also why it's going to cost him more, but that and that alone does not translate into to the best bass for the person considering it.
     
  8. I just think you need to maybe use a IMO, IMHO, or IME, when describing somewhat subjective things such as materials, electronics, or craftmanship. There's no proving that these 3 are better on the Tobias than the Peavey. That's all I'm saying. Yes, other than that, we're telling him the same thing...get what's best for you!

    Rock on....

    Mark
     
  9. Phil Smith

    Phil Smith Mr Sumisu 2 U

    May 30, 2000
    Peoples Republic of Brooklyn
    Creator of: iGigBook for Android/iOS
    IMO you are making a big deal about nothing. Materials aren't subjective. AA quilt maple is different than AAAA quilt maple and you can SEE the difference, which is why it cost more. Does that translate into it will sound better, of course not. The proof is in the playing and your own personal preference.

    If you want to look at anything I say as anything other than opinion then that's your problem. :D The central point here is that he has to figure it out for himself. I think I made that obvious. There's infinite examples of lesser quality instruments that play like butter and sound great as well as high quality instruments that don't. Different strokes for different folks.
     
  10. Okay, I'll give you that. But what if I like the look of brand A's AAAA maple vs. brand B's? is it then subjective? It could happen.

    I have no problem.....I was merely pointing out that you made statements that you represented as fact, when I don't know that they are facts. How do I know Tobias' electronics are better than Peaveys? Has there been a published comparison done somewhere that I havent' seen, by an electrical engineer? And what's better about them, sound? then that would be subjective, wouldn't it?I'll yield to you on craftsmanship, however.
    then what makes them "lesser quality"?????

    and what makes these "high quality"?????

    Don't mean to upset, but I'm not gonna sit idly by if I'm in disagreement. By your profile, you're a much more proficient and experienced bassist, and kudos to you there....
     
  11. Ryan L.

    Ryan L. Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Aug 7, 2000
    West Fargo, ND
    Cirrus Cirrus Cirrus Cirrus.

    That's all I got to say about that.:D
     
  12. Angus

    Angus Supporting Member

    Apr 16, 2000
    Palo Alto, CA
    It all comes down to what kind of tone you want.

    Both basses will sound drastically different. Assuming the Cirrus is probably alder/maple, I'd go for that in a second over the Basic. Zebrawood is known for having somewhat strong high mids, which I don't like! Strong high mids are not desirable...but YMMV.
     
  13. uglybassplayer

    uglybassplayer

    Aug 24, 2001
    New Jersey
    Aaawww :( , look what you guys went & did... you scared poor jensskov away. "Can't we all just get along?"

    Jensskov, if you're still following this thread... What wood combination is the Cirrus?

    - Frank
     
  14. Phil Smith

    Phil Smith Mr Sumisu 2 U

    May 30, 2000
    Peoples Republic of Brooklyn
    Creator of: iGigBook for Android/iOS
    I had a Cirrus with the alder/maple combination and I hated how it sounded and I sold it. On the other hand, I had a Pedulla Thunderbass that was Zebrawood and I loved how it sounded and I sold it too.
     
  15. Phil Smith

    Phil Smith Mr Sumisu 2 U

    May 30, 2000
    Peoples Republic of Brooklyn
    Creator of: iGigBook for Android/iOS
    Mark, when I speak of lesser quality what I mean are things like tuners, bridges, nut material, electronics. When I speak of higher quality what I mean are all of the things above that cost more because the components are of much higher quality in addition to craftsmanship, attention to detail, exotic woods, the look, the feel and the attention to detail. These things however may have nothing to do with the sound that you're after or that you like.
     
  16. uglybassplayer

    uglybassplayer

    Aug 24, 2001
    New Jersey
    Ok Phil, now I'm going to have to jump on your case...

    The Cirrus components... Tuners: Gotoh (Hipshot on Tiger Eye Model) Bridge: ABM Milled (Hipshot on Tiger Eye) Nut: Graphtech. These are the same quality components used on Sukops, Roscoes, and MTD (and Gibson era Tobias) to name a few.

    Pickups & Electronics: While you can argue about Peavey using their own design pups & preamp, I've found them very quiet, and can definately appreciate the extra headroom of the 18v electronics. If this is a Gibson-era Tobias, I doubt the quality of the electronics are any better.

    Craftsmanship: If this is a pre-Gibson Bass made by Michael Tobias himself, I can understand your statement. If this is a Gibson Tobias, I can't believe it. Of the dozen (or so) Cirrus basses I've checked out, every one demonstrated great attention to detail and quality craftsmanship. So far it's the closest a production bass has come to a custom instrument that I've ever played.

    Don't get me wrong, I'm not assuming the Cirrus is an instrument of higher quality, but I wouldn't presume the Tobias either. At least without knowing who made it and what pups/preamp are in it.

    Of course, all this is MHO...

    - Frank
     
  17. uglybassplayer

    uglybassplayer

    Aug 24, 2001
    New Jersey
    :eek: Sorry... If I had read jensskov's second post a little closer, I would have seen that it is a '98 (definately Gibson-era), with Bartolini pickups/electronics. Can't find fault with the Bartolini circut, but I think we can all agree that a Gibson Tobias (including the USA ones) can't compare with the pre-Gibson ones.

    - Frank
     
  18. Ryan L.

    Ryan L. Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Aug 7, 2000
    West Fargo, ND
    I haven't found any problems with craftsmanship on any Cirrus that I have played, either. And I have played quite a few of them. The attention to detail was perfect on every one.

    I have only played one used (Gibson-era) Tobias. It was a nice bass, but I saw NOTHING that would set it way ahead of the Cirrus. So I guess maybe I am not much help with the Tobias'.

    And I suppose I AM a little biased towards the Cirrus.......:p
     
  19. Angus

    Angus Supporting Member

    Apr 16, 2000
    Palo Alto, CA
    Zebrawood top or body? I'm talking about body. The top wood shouldn't affect the tone all that much unless it's fairly thick.
     
  20. Bruce Lindfield

    Bruce Lindfield Unprofessional TalkBass Contributor Gold Supporting Member

    One of the main differences between the Tobias Basic model and say the Classic; is that the Basic has solid body wings and no laminated top. So my pre-gibson Classic is mostly maple with a Zebrawood top and the sound of the maple dominates.

    As the bass in question here is a Basic model, I'm assuming solid Zebrawood body, with a 5-piece maple through neck, with either purple heart or bubinga stringers, plus pau ferro fingerboard.

    I would agree with the others as well that a "real" US-made Tobias (even if it is a Gibson one) will hold its value better than a Peavey. But as to which is better, it's really a question of listening to each and playing to see which suits you best - they will probably sound quite different.

    What would swing it for me is the better playability of the Tobias "assymetrical" neck.