1. Please take 30 seconds to register your free account to remove most ads, post topics, make friends, earn reward points at our store, and more!  
     
    TalkBass.com has been uniting the low end since 1998.  Join us! :)

cleaning my fretboard, with what?

Discussion in 'Basses [BG]' started by MarkMcCombs, Jan 16, 2002.


  1. My Cirrus has a Pao Ferro fretboard, what should I clean/treat this with? I remember a thread long ago, but there was no consensus as to lemon oil, tung oil, etc. Any suggestions?
     
  2. First clean fretboard with Naptha then...

    From: "fred"
    Subject: Re: cleaning a fretboard
    Date: Friday, December 17, 1999 7:38 AM
    On Thu, 16 Dec 1999 22:13:47 -0600, Chris Homco wrote:

    >Hello all.
    >
    >Somone mentioned before how to clean a fretboard / what to use if
    >someone could say again it would be much apprecieated
    >
    >Chris

    here are a couple of comments roger sadowsky made viw the bottom line


    Mark:

    I can only speak from my experience in oiling fingerboards--I did try using Old English Lemon Oil for about a year and did have the sense that the boards were getting too dry with that. I never tried other types of lemon oil. I also was not commenting on maintaining oil finished basses as I do not do oil finished and do not have any expertise or opinion on that.

    I was only stating my preference for linseed oil on fingerboards and to advocate against letting it soak in for long periods. I should also have specified BOILED linseed oil as opposed to raw--raw takes too long to cure.

    However, I have checked the definitive finishing reference book "Understanding Wood Finishing" by Bob Flexner. He writes:
    "MYTH: Oil finishes should be maintained with lemon oil
    FACT: Lemon oil, an oily mineral-spirits solvent with a lemon scent
    added, is a very short-lived maintenance product. It is a furniture polish that will help pick up dust, add temporary shine to a dull surface, and reduce scratching until it evaporates--which it will do
    within a few days. The fresh scent it imparts is a large part of its appeal."

    Flexner recommends maintaining oil finishes with a new coat of the original finish or with paste wax.

    I hope this helps!


    Roger Sadowsky

    Sadowsky Guitars Ltd.
    1600 Broadway #1000
    New York, NY 10019
    (212) 586-3960 voice
    (212) 765-5231 fax
    email: sadowsky@bway.net
    web: www.sadowsky.com

    ----------------------------------------------------
    From: "fred"
    Subject: Re: cleaning a fretboard
    Date: Friday, December 17, 1999 7:43 AM

    On Thu, 16 Dec 1999 22:13:47 -0600, Chris Homco
    <hotwheel@brook.ffni.com> wrote:

    >Hello all.
    >
    >Somone mentioned before how to clean a fretboard / what to use if
    >someone could say again it would be much apprecieated
    >
    >Chris


    here's roger's original post about linseed oil:

    From: Roger Sadowsky
    Date: Sat, 10 Feb 1996 08:30:28 -0500 (EST)
    Subject: Re: oiling fingerboards

    FROM: Dalton L Tomlinson (K3-MO112)
    SUBJECT: Oiling fret boards question

    When I oil the fret board, I take off all strings, oil up and soak over night. I HAVE NOT loosened the truss rod. Do you see this as a problem?

    The issue of adjusting the truss rod when oiling a fingeboard is not an issue. The issue is what kind of oil you are using and how long you are "soaking". I recommend linseed oil and DO NOT recommend soaking. Just cover the entire fingerboard with enough oil to just "wet" the
    board, let it stand no more than 5 minutes, and wipe off all the excess with a dry paper towel. If you want to let it "air dry" overnight before you restring--that's OK--but don't "wet-soak" the board for long periods of time.

    Oils that are sold for wood finishing like tung oil preparations get too gummy feeling in my opinion. I have always found lemon oil (as in
    Old English) to make boards dry out faster than if left alone. After 24 years of this, I still like linseed oil the best.

    Roger Sadowsky


    fred