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cleaning my fretboard, with what?

Discussion in 'Basses [BG]' started by MarkMcCombs, Jan 16, 2002.


  1. My Cirrus has a Pao Ferro fretboard, what should I clean/treat this with? I remember a thread long ago, but there was no consensus as to lemon oil, tung oil, etc. Any suggestions?
     
  2. First clean fretboard with Naptha then...

    From: "fred"
    Subject: Re: cleaning a fretboard
    Date: Friday, December 17, 1999 7:38 AM
    On Thu, 16 Dec 1999 22:13:47 -0600, Chris Homco wrote:

    >Hello all.
    >
    >Somone mentioned before how to clean a fretboard / what to use if
    >someone could say again it would be much apprecieated
    >
    >Chris

    here are a couple of comments roger sadowsky made viw the bottom line


    Mark:

    I can only speak from my experience in oiling fingerboards--I did try using Old English Lemon Oil for about a year and did have the sense that the boards were getting too dry with that. I never tried other types of lemon oil. I also was not commenting on maintaining oil finished basses as I do not do oil finished and do not have any expertise or opinion on that.

    I was only stating my preference for linseed oil on fingerboards and to advocate against letting it soak in for long periods. I should also have specified BOILED linseed oil as opposed to raw--raw takes too long to cure.

    However, I have checked the definitive finishing reference book "Understanding Wood Finishing" by Bob Flexner. He writes:
    "MYTH: Oil finishes should be maintained with lemon oil
    FACT: Lemon oil, an oily mineral-spirits solvent with a lemon scent
    added, is a very short-lived maintenance product. It is a furniture polish that will help pick up dust, add temporary shine to a dull surface, and reduce scratching until it evaporates--which it will do
    within a few days. The fresh scent it imparts is a large part of its appeal."

    Flexner recommends maintaining oil finishes with a new coat of the original finish or with paste wax.

    I hope this helps!


    Roger Sadowsky

    Sadowsky Guitars Ltd.
    1600 Broadway #1000
    New York, NY 10019
    (212) 586-3960 voice
    (212) 765-5231 fax
    email: sadowsky@bway.net
    web: www.sadowsky.com

    ----------------------------------------------------
    From: "fred"
    Subject: Re: cleaning a fretboard
    Date: Friday, December 17, 1999 7:43 AM

    On Thu, 16 Dec 1999 22:13:47 -0600, Chris Homco
    <hotwheel@brook.ffni.com> wrote:

    >Hello all.
    >
    >Somone mentioned before how to clean a fretboard / what to use if
    >someone could say again it would be much apprecieated
    >
    >Chris


    here's roger's original post about linseed oil:

    From: Roger Sadowsky
    Date: Sat, 10 Feb 1996 08:30:28 -0500 (EST)
    Subject: Re: oiling fingerboards

    FROM: Dalton L Tomlinson (K3-MO112)
    SUBJECT: Oiling fret boards question

    When I oil the fret board, I take off all strings, oil up and soak over night. I HAVE NOT loosened the truss rod. Do you see this as a problem?

    The issue of adjusting the truss rod when oiling a fingeboard is not an issue. The issue is what kind of oil you are using and how long you are "soaking". I recommend linseed oil and DO NOT recommend soaking. Just cover the entire fingerboard with enough oil to just "wet" the
    board, let it stand no more than 5 minutes, and wipe off all the excess with a dry paper towel. If you want to let it "air dry" overnight before you restring--that's OK--but don't "wet-soak" the board for long periods of time.

    Oils that are sold for wood finishing like tung oil preparations get too gummy feeling in my opinion. I have always found lemon oil (as in
    Old English) to make boards dry out faster than if left alone. After 24 years of this, I still like linseed oil the best.

    Roger Sadowsky


    fred