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Click-clack sound from Music Man

Discussion in 'Basses [BG]' started by GreggBummer, Sep 11, 2019.


  1. dr doofie

    dr doofie

    Jul 6, 2017
    Jersey (New)
    Wares yore uhther tipo?
     
  2. Cyborg

    Cyborg

    Jul 7, 2007
    Lowcountry, SC
    I'm all about a StingRay bass! With that said, the SR is very sensitive to strings and technique and can be very unforgiving. They are not for everyone and there's nothing wrong with that. Also, with most SR users there is usually a clankiness to it when you dig in. There are several reasons why this is the case as covered in this thread from the voicing of the SR, setup, technique, strings, etc.

    You have a few of options if you are confident on your setup.
    1. You are are going to have to EQ out what you don't want hear out. I know you said you don't want to do that but that's why amps and active basses have EQ. They are tools to help you get the tone you need/want. Plus, you already know this gives you a satisfactory result tonally.
    2. Another option is to use different strings. You said you just put a fresh set of EB Nickels on it. Maybe give them some time for the newness/spank to mellow out. Also, you could try mellower nickel strings but I wouldn't go for flats as your next move. Stainless strings, you probably should get that idea out of your head if you are trying to eliminate or tame the clankiness, as that will most likely make it worse.
    3. Even though you have set it up already, maybe raise the action just a tiny bit more.
    Just food for thought, the clankiness can often disappear in a band setting. My old '89 3-band SR4 was very clanky at home and I would EQ most of it out. I would play out with it at a gig or rehearsal and I'd dial the EQ settings that produced the clank right back in because the EQ settings sounded right in a band context, even though I couldn't hear the clank itself.
     
    GreggBummer likes this.
  3. Cave Puppy

    Cave Puppy "Humph Bo, he's wond!" - John Lennon

    Jan 13, 2015
    Most welcome.
     
  4. dr doofie

    dr doofie

    Jul 6, 2017
    Jersey (New)
    He needs to be wounded? Ouch! ;)
     
    Jeff Scott likes this.
  5. So, a little update.

    I put electrical tape on the pickup and and I found that the clacking sound remained. I took a close look at the strings over the pickup. The strings have plenty of room to vibrate without hitting the poles.

    So, I’m down to strings, setup, or technique.

    At this time, I believe that it is a combination of all three. I am going to try I different set of strings (chrome rounds or flats maybe), and take it to guy I trust for a good set up. I may replace the nut just for insurance.

    Some asked the question- Why not just EQ it out? I could, but I’d rather address the other problems first. That should minimize the EQ adjustments. I’d like to have a “baseline” without the the clack.

    Rehearsal was cancelled this week. I’ll see how it sounds in a band context the way it is now. Then, take it for new strings and a set up.
     
    Last edited: Sep 12, 2019
  6. Jeff Scott

    Jeff Scott Rickenbacker guru.......... Supporting Member

    Apr 11, 2006
    Here it is.

    Ferrari Tipo 500 01.

    The nut is not the problem. You said this Click and Clack (isn't this trademarked, or something? :woot:) happens all over the board. Once you press down on any fret, the nut is taken out of the equation.
     
    GreggBummer and JimmyM like this.
  7. dr doofie

    dr doofie

    Jul 6, 2017
    Jersey (New)
    Get chromes. Please note that tweaking EQ from instrument to instrument IS getting a baseline. These “problems” are most likely not problems at all but simply how that particular bass responds. I have this particular bass. I have another bass. They react differently, play differently, affect me differently. Altering EQ is getting a baseline. When we as people interact, we tweak certain things in ourselves, act in subtly different ways, and accommodate their unique personalities as they do with us. It’s relationship. Use that analogy with your instrument. Good luck my friend:)
     
    GreggBummer likes this.
  8. dr doofie

    dr doofie

    Jul 6, 2017
    Jersey (New)
    Parked it on the lawn again, I see...;)
    That is a beautiful automobile.
     
    Jeff Scott likes this.
  9. mouthmw

    mouthmw

    Jul 19, 2009
    Croatia
    I have a 2 bander with flats. I played rounds on my 2 banders for years (EB Super Slinky) and loved it, but was always curious about flats on a 2 bander for that old school 70s Stingray tone.

    Now that I also have a 3 bander that wears rounds, I've decided to put flats on my 2 bander. I love them both. Just wanted 2 flavors of Stingray goodness.

    Both of them have the same low action too - 1.5mm on E, 1.25mm on A, 1mm on D and G strings (measured at the 12th fret). No issues with clankiness or fret buzz. Heck I want my 3 bander to have some spank when I dig in, and it does, but nothing that would make the notes fret out. And I don't have a super light touch either.

    I just bonded well with the instrument and found my perfect spot setup wise. It didn't happen over night, but a few years of playing it. I also reduced the stagger of the pole pieces on the pickup - if anything, it's much much more comfortable to play over the pickup now, as I don't hit the pole pieces. I did this by pushing the A and D pole pieces a bit, and raising the pickup cover by shimming it. All part of the setup process for me.
     
    GreggBummer and Mingus_Habens like this.
  10. dr doofie

    dr doofie

    Jul 6, 2017
    Jersey (New)
    This 100%
     
    CoffeeLove likes this.
  11. I pulled the Ernie Ball strings from the bass. I strung the bass up with D’Addario nickels (No chromes in the shop, too impatient for Amazon). I did some googling and set the bass up according to the factory specs from the Music Man website. The offensive clacking noise has almost completely disappeared. What’s left is CERTAINLY from my right hand technique.

    I guess the bass doesn’t like Ernie Ball strings. Also, I think I did poor job with the initial set up.

    Thank you very much for your input. It helped to narrow it down.
     
    Cyborg and Rayjay like this.
  12. Jeff Scott

    Jeff Scott Rickenbacker guru.......... Supporting Member

    Apr 11, 2006
    Probably, not a poor job, just not the one this particular bass wanted.
     
  13. Do you mind sharing those specs?
     
  14. FAQ | Ernie Ball Music Man

    I just used what I found there under "Music Man Basses" about half way down the page.

    Hope that helps.
     
    Mingus_Habens likes this.
  15. Thanks.
    Those are the exact same instructions I tried to follow when doing the first setup on my EBMM Caprice.
    After setting up the neck relief, I ended up with an excessive up bow and stratospherically high action (even with the saddles completely down). Measuring the neck relief (0.30 millimeters) from the 2nd to the 12th fret was the cause of the problem. After setting up the exact same relief from the first to last fret (think Fender instructions), I ended up with an ALMOST straight action and optimal strings height, with enough space on the saddles to go up or down.
    I don't know why EBMM suggests that, honestly. It just messed up my Caprice completely.
     
  16. mouthmw

    mouthmw

    Jul 19, 2009
    Croatia
    I only use EB Super Slinky on my Stingrays (for flats needs I use EB Traditional flats Group III). By far the best roundwounds I've tested on all my Stingrays, and I have zero clack issues. It's all subjective opinions.
     

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