Clipping flanger pedal

Discussion in 'Effects [BG]' started by Meysiv, Jul 7, 2022.

  1. Meysiv

    Meysiv

    Oct 31, 2021
    Paris, France
    So I have this late 80's / early 90's bass flanger pedal (I talked about it here trying to gather informations about it, so if you know anything, please drop me a comment! :)) that goes clipping everytime I dig in a bit. And I tend to do that a lot. :whistle:

    That's nothing much really, some kind of crackling, weird gated farty buzzes when I slam a low E or when I dig into some heavy plucking.
    The problem is even more blatant when I use my Epiphone Jack Casady, that seems to have quite a hot output. I know there is some impedance deal with that pickup, but that never caused any problem with any other pedal.

    I isolated the pedal (like basse>pedal>amp) as I read it here in another thread, but the clipping remains (so I assume it really is from my pickup and not because of drives being in front of it).
    Note that the sound goes smoothly through the pedal without clipping anything when it's off, either by itself or within my signal chain (so I presume true bypass...?)

    So my questions here are:

    Is this something that can be adjusted? I read here and there that people would calibrate either the BBD or the op-amp if any (I don’t know much about electronics and stuffs, so I don’t know if the pedal actually is a BBD circuit or rely on an op-amp, but that's the examples I saw and there is something doing something in there.. :unsure:).

    If not, I think it'll unfortunately have to go back on the shelf and I'll be looking for another flanger pedal.
    So is this something usual with old school analog modulation pedals?
    Should I go digital instead?
    I have a shortlist of pedals I have in mind regarding the controls I need and my personnal pros/cons, but I'd rather like to know if it's something I'm going to run into again before buying anything.

    Thanks in advance!
     
  2. monti2889

    monti2889

    Jul 19, 2012
    Have you tried putting the pedal into your effects loop? That could be interesting. Also, some pedals will have a trim pot on the circuit board that can adjust various things, like frequency response, input gains to an op-amp...etc....I'll go check the other thread and get back here to see if there's any thing else I can add for ye.
     
  3. Meysiv

    Meysiv

    Oct 31, 2021
    Paris, France
    I didn't try it thoroughly when checking things out yesterday, I'll try that! But latest rehearsal I did last week, I plugged my modulation and time pedals in the effect loop and I believe that I think I did hear something at some point nonetheless (like when going clean with the flanger and the drive doesn't cover up anymore), but I'll do a check today, thank you for your input!

    I see. that lines up with some of the things I read last night when searching about it.
    I read the few threads I could find with various similar keywords and different effects that could have similar issues here on TB and some other forums, but that's always quite specific (often drive pedals or passive/active related) and the solutions provided usually goes with cleaning up with the bass knobs or adding a boost or so... but well, at this point, I might as well just send the incriminated pedal to the bleachers. :D

    Thank you again!
     
  4. monti2889

    monti2889

    Jul 19, 2012
    Who knows sometimes they're just finicky. It's still work it to crack it open and see what gremlins may be hiding in there. Could just need cleaning, and dust blown out....or you could find a burnt resister or something that might point to it needing repaired. From what I read, it's supposed to be able to handle lower frequencies like bass, baratone guitars. To bad you couldn't split it off and run it parallel, then the glitchiness might be desirable like an old octaver or something.
     
  5. GMC

    GMC Supporting Member

    Jan 1, 2006
    Wiltshire, UK
    It's probably a pedal designed for Line level or 70's passive single coil pickups. Modern active / humbucker / high impedance pickups will easily over whelm it. Pop an input buffer at the beginning of you chain (like a Source Audio Zio) and it'll iron out these kinds of issues.
     
    bassbrad and SunnBass like this.
  6. Meysiv

    Meysiv

    Oct 31, 2021
    Paris, France
    I'll try to open it up, who knows!
     
  7. Meysiv

    Meysiv

    Oct 31, 2021
    Paris, France
    There is a Boss TU-3 tuner before it, isn't it a buffered output pedal?

    So if I were to change of pedal, you suggest I should go with a recent production (whether it's analog or digital) instead of some old school gear (I was thinking about a Boss BF-2B as it can come kinda cheap, but these are 80's gear as well)?
     
    Last edited: Jul 7, 2022
  8. GMC

    GMC Supporting Member

    Jan 1, 2006
    Wiltshire, UK
    I tend to steer clear of old Boss analogue pedals. They were great in their day and really trail blazed a lot of effects. But their enclosures are kind of clunky and their power / buffering is often an issue. I've had a long love / hate relationship with various Boss Chorus and OC-2's. I'm kind of done with them. However, the CE-2 and DC-2 are legendary sounds. I just don't like the rest of the pedal.

    On my hunt for the perfect modulation pedal, I tried a lot of analogue and digital pedals. I found that Modulation is something that's easy for Digital to do well. So even a low quality digital effect can get some really descent results (like a Zoom MS-70CDR). I used a Strymon Mobius for my modulations for a number of years, it was good but not great on bass. It's very limited mixer / blend options, lack of any bass friendly EQ / tone options left me feeling "Meh!"

    These day's I've settled on a Source Audio Lunar as my modulation pedal of choice. I have it set quite simply, I use the 6 in built patches and the 4 stock knobs. It's very easy to use and a simple dial in. I have 2 great chorus patches, A great leslie patch. A great chopper patch and two phaser patches. I don't use a flanger much, although I can push one of my chorus patches into flanger territory. it's fairly cheap for an exotic multi mod digital pedal and it's relatively small and compact for such a power house.
     
    rsmith601 likes this.
  9. Meysiv

    Meysiv

    Oct 31, 2021
    Paris, France
    I don't really have a special thing with Boss pedals. The only two I have on my board are the tuner and a LS-2 for clean blend with my dirt pedals. So two pedals that don't even make sound. :laugh:
    But since it seems that the BF-2 (and its bass version) is somehow THE flanger sound (alongside others from EHX, Maxon or MXR to stick to the classics), I thought I'd give it a try.

    Yes, I ran into your posts quite often when browsing threads to find some ideas or leads, that was very informative!

    I actually have the Source Audio Mercury in my shortlist. I don't have much use for a lot of modulation but chorus and flanger so I look either for a pedal that can do both - like my Guyatone, the MXR M83 (whose price tag is outrageous) or the EBS UniChorus (which unfortunately does not have a Feedback knob so is quite limited if I want to go in noise territory like I do with my band) - or a standard 4 knobs flanger that I can dim to a chorus (here are the Source Audio Mercury, the Boss BF-2B, the DOD FX72 or the Walrus Audio Polychrome if the price ever drop :rolleyes:...).
    But there's a quite cheap secondhand ad for a Source Audio Mercury that I found on a French website, so I might take the leap.
    If you think of something I missed by the way, I'm all ears!
     
  10. Meysiv

    Meysiv

    Oct 31, 2021
    Paris, France
    Right on comrade! No clipping nor crack when put in the effect loop!

    Yes, it actually takes the low end really well!
    I don’t know if there is some kind of split signal with clean blend or something somewhere in the circuitry but I never felt that my sound lost definition or was crushed when turning it on.
     
    Killing Floor likes this.
  11. My uneducated shot in the dark says it's a matter of headroom and your low E slams it into the ceiling, so to speak.

    Can you bump up the voltage to 12V or 18V? Please don't do that if its 9V-only, BTW.
     
  12. The Casady has a very hot output. Did you try all 3 impedance switch settings?
     
  13. Meysiv

    Meysiv

    Oct 31, 2021
    Paris, France
    The enclosure doesn't mention anything and the only informations I have about the pedal now is from a Japanese catalogue from 1992 that only mention 9V, so I won't risk it for now.

    But I'm yet to find the manual, so if it turns out to be doable, I think powering it in 12V will be the easiest solution.

    Thank you for your input!
     
  14. I feel like this deserves a rim shot for humor. Hope it all works out because flange is a pretty cool effect. I personally use the Walrus Audio Polychrome. Cheers!
     
    Meysiv likes this.
  15. Meysiv

    Meysiv

    Oct 31, 2021
    Paris, France
    It seems so! The clipping is indeed not as pronounced with the lowest impedance, but I personnaly only use the highest impedance. And it's also less pronounced with my Aerodyne (but somehow still there, so the headroom must be reeeaaally low)
     
  16. Meysiv

    Meysiv

    Oct 31, 2021
    Paris, France
    Not intended! So I kinda made myself laugh here, thanks for pointing it out!

    The Polychrome sounds amazing really, I really hope I can run into a not too pricey one someday!
     
  17. devnulljp

    devnulljp Supporting Member

    Oct 13, 2009
    BC, Canada
    Admin on the D*A*M Forum
    Lots of things can cause a pedal to clip

    Here's a video of the same pedal and no clipping.
     
    Meysiv likes this.
  18. Meysiv

    Meysiv

    Oct 31, 2021
    Paris, France
    The whole thing is clipping here. For real, I'll never understand gear demos shot with phones. :laugh:

    But I saw this video before and tried to retrieve it the other day but didn't find anything when browsing YouTube, thank you!
     
  19. Adienn7

    Adienn7

    Jan 26, 2007
    put it before gain after your compressor.. Level the signal before the pedal
     
  20. @GMC is correct about the pedals of that era being more sensitive to higher input levels, whether they are analog or early digital the designers did not add tolerance for today's high output equipment nor were most of them designed with the frequency response and dynamic range a bass ever in mind. That is simply the charm and curse of choosing to use vintage effects. One of my favorite flangers, Danelectro PsychoFlange, has a very low threshold and easily distorts but it has such a unique 'triple thick' sound it is worth the additional care.
     
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