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College Question

Discussion in 'Off Topic [BG]' started by LiquidMidnight, Apr 5, 2003.


  1. LiquidMidnight

    LiquidMidnight

    Dec 25, 2000
    Hello all, I have a serious question about college.

    It's looks like I'll be having a life change soon. (I'll probaly be moving) I'm going to be moving to a college town. After a stint as an IT techinician, I realized that computers aren't really my thing. I enjoy computers, but I'm just not passionate about them enough to make them my career. I'm thinking that having a chance to attend a 4 year college would be a great oppurtunity. (I'm thinking of getting a BS in Pyschology, finding work with that, then working on a Ph.d. Of course, that's just a loose plan as I find usually making intricate plans in life to be self-defeating as life usually never works out the way you plan it) I've been throwing around the ideas of getting ready to take SATs, getting letter's of recommendation, ect. when today I realized, in high school, I took the business course. That means that I didn't take a foreign language and I didn't take algebra, trig, ect. I thought I was work in the business field (computers) when I got out of school, so I didn't worry about those things. (Funny how everyone expects you to decide what you want to do with the rest of your life by the time you're 17/18, like you really know right then :rolleyes: ) I'm pretty sure that at least a foreign language in hs is a requirement for most college's. My question is, Am I wrong? Will this prevent me from attending college. Is there a way to get around this. Will they let me attend but just add the courses I didn't take in high school into my college schedule, ect.

    Thank you for any information you can give me. :)
     
  2. DigMe

    DigMe

    Aug 10, 2002
    Waco, TX
    Hmm..I think you're right for many colleges but there may be exceptions and if a college does want you to have a foreign language then you could take it along with some of your other required lower level courses at a junior college and then transfer to a 4 year university.

    You'd probably really just need to check with the colleges that you're interested in. I want to say that there were a couple of people that I came across in my college Spanish classes that hadn't had it in high school but that may be faulty memory.

    brad cook
     
  3. All colleges are different, so you'll probably need to contact the one that you plan on attending. It would be easy to catch up at a Junior college, and just make sure that the college accepts the Junior college's credits.

    jtbp
     
  4. LiquidMidnight

    LiquidMidnight

    Dec 25, 2000
    How long does a junior college course last, if you don't mind me asking.
     
  5. Chris Fitzgerald

    Chris Fitzgerald Student of Life Staff Member Administrator

    Oct 19, 2000
    Louisville, KY
    I teach at two colleges, one of which I graduated from way back when. I never had any languages while in high school, and was never asked about it at any of the three colleges I ended up attending. At UofL (the last one) I had to take a year of German to fulfill the degree requirements. It was no big deal, and was actually kind of fun. I wouldn't worry about it.
     
  6. Here in Omaha, I go to Metro community college. The courses are 10-11 weeks long, but summmer courses can be as little as like 5 weeks, but you go to class for a long period of time once or twice a week. Not too bad, and the tuition is normally a lot cheaper than a University.

    jtbp
     
  7. Mael

    Mael

    Mar 25, 2003
    Ann Arbor, MI
    Based on my experiance, you don't "need" to have taken languages or anything in specific, but, it's recommended at most colleges. At the very least, if you're pursuing a liberal arts degree, you will have to take a language, and a certain number of semesters of it. Take as many of the general education requirements at a communtiy college as you can, it will save you a lot of money in the long run, and they're usually a lot easier. If you haven't been in school for a long time, it'll make getting back into the school routine a lot easier.
     
  8. Ty McNeely

    Ty McNeely

    Mar 27, 2000
    TX
    The answer to that is yes. You are wrong, in the sense that most colleges don't require you to take a foreign language, but many do. It all depends on the different colleges.

    It depends. Sometimes there is a way around it, and that also depends on other factors such as ACT/SAT score and class rank/GPA.

    For me there was. The college I'm about to start attending (Baylor University in Waco, TX) requires a foreign language, but I didn't have it. I filled out my application, then called the Admissions office to see what I should do. They informed me that I need to write a formal letter to the admissions committee explaining why I hadn't taken a foreign language. I guess they liked my reasons because I got my acceptance letter less than two weeks after I sent that letter.

    I can almost guarantee that you WILL have to have at least two extra semesters of a foreign language on top of what is already required for your degree. If your degree doesn't require any extras, you will most likely only have to take the two semesters you missed out on in high school.

    No problem. Just take it from someone who's been there....DO NOT STRESS!!!


    P.S. Don't forget to end questions with a question mark in your essay ;)
     
  9. LiquidMidnight

    LiquidMidnight

    Dec 25, 2000
    Thanks for all of the replies guys. You really have put me at ease. I was really stressing that.

    Community college does sound like a good idea. Though the town I'm moving to does have a branch of Penn State, I'm not limiting myself to attending, just that school. (esp. since a lot universities require you to live at a dorm the first year. Tuition and living cost is probaly going to be a big concern)

    I have another question though, does the college you recieved your degree from pull much weight in the real world? For example, do you think an employer would be more impressed with a degree from a state university or ivy league than a community college?

    Also, since I'm definatley not going to have everything ready by the fall, is it possible to start attending a college at the 2nd semester, or will I have to wait a whole year?

    Again, thanks for all the help.

    p.s. And Hunter, I actually scored very high in my English/Lit/Journalism classes in high school, but I usually I'm not very anal about my grammar on message boards. ;)
     
  10. Ty McNeely

    Ty McNeely

    Mar 27, 2000
    TX


    It does not have any effect in "the real world" from what I understand. If you intend to attend a graduate school of any kind (where acceptance is difficult), then it can make a very big difference.

    Most places will allow you to start the second semester, although receiving financial aid will be difficult.
     
  11. Chris Fitzgerald

    Chris Fitzgerald Student of Life Staff Member Administrator

    Oct 19, 2000
    Louisville, KY
    You can't generalize about "the real world" on matters such as this. In some circles, the school you attend is extremely important. In others, not so much. If you decide to go the community college route, the school that potential employers will look at is the one at which you complete your four year degree, so be sure to check out that school's reputation if you're worried about this issue.
     
  12. Ty McNeely

    Ty McNeely

    Mar 27, 2000
    TX

    The reason I say it's not really important is because whenever I asked a question about graduating with honors, some higher-up management types here told me that it really makes no difference.

    I guess it all depends on what you're going to be doing.