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color changing bass ??

Discussion in 'Hardware, Setup & Repair [BG]' started by pkr2, May 29, 2002.


  1. pkr2

    pkr2

    Apr 28, 2000
    coastal N.C.
    I've been thinking about doing some experimenting with Krylons color changing paint as a finish for a bass body.

    Have any of you guys had any hands on experience with this product?

    What does everyone think about a bass that changes color? Would it be too gaudy? Good idea or pipe dream?

    Opinions are encouraged.

    Pkr2
     
  2. Is this paint a type that changes with temperature shifts or the type that changes color with different light angles like the DuPont stuff?
     
  3. JAUQO III-X

    JAUQO III-X Banned

    Jan 4, 2002
    CHICAGO,IL.
    Endorsing artist:see profile.
    Spector offers something similar.
     
  4. Frank Martin

    Frank Martin Bitten by the luthiery bug...

    Oct 8, 2001
    Budapest, Hungary, EU
    I remember some toys I had when I was young. There were some that changed colour when you put them in... WATER! :D I guess you wouldn't try that...:cool:
     
  5. Frank Martin

    Frank Martin Bitten by the luthiery bug...

    Oct 8, 2001
    Budapest, Hungary, EU
    This thing with water actually works with normal basses, too: yesterday there was a great storm here and I got soaking wet. Even my axe in my gigbag, it was raining so intensely. Those drops of water left some marks and spots on the shiny black finish. It took some time to get them off:mad:
     
  6. rickbass

    rickbass Supporting Member

    Rickenbacker didn't think it was too gaudy. In the 60's, they made the Model 331 "light show" guitar with the clear plastic top that changed colors (remember that one?). The lighting circuitry in the body that lit up the colored lights under the top was frequency-modulated; yellow for treble, blue for bass, (I think) and some other colors for other freq's.

    [​IMG]

    That holoflash-type paint job, like Carvin's "harlequin primastique," and Spector's "holoflash", looks pretty nauseating when it isn't under lighting.
     
  7. pkr2

    pkr2

    Apr 28, 2000
    coastal N.C.
    I'm thinking of the stuff that changes with light, Hambone.

    I've spent a little time researching on the net but the only one that I've found so far is the Krylon site. I'll check the DuPont site. Thanks.

    As far as I can determine it uses basically about the same technology as the automotive industry uses.

    Can you imagine playing a bass like that with LEDs in the FB? It would look like you were playing a Pepsi sign. :)

    Pkr2
     
  8. from my understanding it just depends on viewing angle. on cars anyway, it's a solid coat of one color with a thin (very thin) coat of another over top. then when you look at it directly, you see the solid color, because the thin coat is almost invisible. if you look at it flat along the surface, you see more of the misted color. it works for cars because of the many curved surfaces. if you try it on a bass you won't get as much 'changing' because of the large flat surfaces.

    this is my understanding and i guarantee none of it.
     
  9. get the irridecent paint that they use on cars.... ya know it has like purple flake, redflake, ec in it...

    of course a 3 or 4 oz bottle of it costs 400 bucks...
     
  10. I'm with Milo on this one, aside from the paint there are a couple of things needed to get the best effect:

    1. Lots of compound curves
    2. A bright, tight, point light source.

    My experience comes from a friends racecar. I did the lettering and then tried to photograph it. What looked great in the sun to my eyes, never transferred to film. It is a very elusive effect. What ever color was predominant at the angle you were at looked great but the "changing" aspect left a bit to be desired.

    They have a thread about this over on the MIMF in the finishes forum if you're interested.
     
  11. In the Carvin catalog, i saw a country singer has a signature geetar that has an irridecent color changing finish. I don't remember the guys name though.
     
  12. pkr2

    pkr2

    Apr 28, 2000
    coastal N.C.
    Thanks for the feedback, guys.

    I guess I was trying to reinvent the wheel. :)

    I'm going to try to get Krylon to send me some color sample chips.

    I'm pretty sure, now, after weighing the input that I wouldn't get the results that I'm looking for.

    Pkr2
     
  13. CS

    CS

    Dec 11, 1999
    UK
    The problem with two tone colour changing paint on 3D surfaces is that you can end up with mismatches. If theres way of making the front on the bass change (if it has a flat front of course) then that would be IMHO better. Have a look at the new colours on the Gibson site, theres some horrible (again IMHO) side effects.

    BTW nice to 'see' you again
     
  14. pkr2

    pkr2

    Apr 28, 2000
    coastal N.C.
    Yeah, Chris. That's what I've decided too. The lack of compound curves is probably be the downfall of the idea.

    Nice to see you too, Chris. Thanks for the input.

    Pkr2
     
  15. My guitarists dad owns Protec Paints, he painted his phone cover in this "chameleon paint". Its very expensive but worth it. He was explaining it to me and the principles behind it.

    The paint acts a bit like oil in water, except you deal with a base coat and another coat(s) in a sense floating on top.

    His phone looks pretty groovy, one angle it is green, move around and it morphs into purple. For a bass i think it would be a good idea, but is uncommon due to the expense of the paint (he told me a price.. it was a ridiculous amount, something like $100 for 500 ml or a litre).

    Under lights i am not sure what effect this chameleon paint would have, as basses tend to be radically different aka my aqua bass looks black under some lights.

    Go for it i say, or buy a piece of wood and finish it and see what it looks like before doing the whole bass body.

    :D:D

    Merls
     
  16. Ok i spoke to my guitarist about this. Silly thing to do seeing as he makes the stuff. lol So I'll save you the molecular structure talk.

    Basically the best thing to do is apply a black primer first. Apparently this cuts down the amount of Harlequin (flip flop) paint you need to use, and also it utilises more of the "colour changing" aspects of the paint. He said it was found that by using any other colour or even just the bare wood, it used up so much more paint.

    I got a price re-assurance from him, his company is cheap for paint, this stuff goes for $1000 a litre, and apparently you can only buy it in 1 litre cans and upwards. He said a bass would need about 250ml if used with a black primer applied first.

    Hope this helps anyone.

    And if you have a black bass, well half the jobs done heehee.

    :D:D

    Merls
     
  17. pkr2

    pkr2

    Apr 28, 2000
    coastal N.C.
    Thanks for checking, Merl.

    Oh well, it looked good on paper.

    I don't suppose you could convince the guitar player to send me a couple of liters as a sample. :)

    Pkr2
     
  18. Yes there is a wicked color changing paint made by either Sola or Flex in Santa Rosa CA. A good musician friend of mine worked there used to actually make it.

    They are the company that manufactures the color changing ink on the new US bills.

    I've seen a proto type car painted with it and it changes color from Black, to Purple to Blue, to Green, to Red... the color changes by the slight difference in angle that it is viewed.

    From what I understand the Police & FBI were in the process of Outlawing the Paint for cars because of ID problems for them.
     
  19. Not to mention the extreme chemistry/physics behind the paint, but due to the expense only "show" cars are painted in it. still looks good.

    Pkr2, you may be able to get it cheaper where you live. Australia is sooo expensive.

    :D:D

    Merls