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Combination of Woods for a Bass...

Discussion in 'Basses [BG]' started by bertbassplayer, Dec 12, 2001.


  1. I was wondering what some good neck/fingerboard and Body wood combinations are, ones that look great and sound great too.
     
  2. Woodchuck

    Woodchuck

    Apr 21, 2000
    Atlanta / Macon (sigh)
    Gallien Krueger for the last 12 years!
    My Eshenbaugh 5 is going to have an alder body with a walnut top, and maple/ebony/walnut neck, a rosewood board, and a walnut top on the headstock.
     
  3. jasonbraatz

    jasonbraatz

    Oct 18, 2000
    Oakland, CA
    my favorite woods are bubinga for the body and wenge for the neck and fingerboard.


    jason
     
  4. geshel

    geshel

    Oct 2, 2001
    Seattle
    Might I suggest doing a little work by utilizing the gift that is the TalkBass archives to find the two or three recent threads on the subject?
     
  5. rickreyn

    rickreyn

    Jun 16, 2000
    Lutz, Florida
    Bubinga top, walnut body, walnut and maple neck and pau ferro fingerboard.
     
  6. First geshel I did a search, but all the previous ones have been "What's the Best Body" or "Maple or Rosewood Fingerboard" or the like, I didn't find one that addressed the combination of the two working together.
     
  7. rickreyn

    rickreyn

    Jun 16, 2000
    Lutz, Florida
    Yeah this stuff has been rehashed. But post a question, and they'll come. Complain though we might, most of us like to weigh in on the same topics time and time again.
     
  8. embellisher

    embellisher Holy Ghost filled Bass Player Staff Member Supporting Member

    I like wenge or rock maple for necks, ebony or birdseye maple for fingerboards, swamp ash for bodies, and something hard and pretty for the top.

    In the next few months, I will be building a P/MM 5 string.

    Wenge neck, macassar ebony board, swamp ash body, flame maple top. I can't wait to hear what it sounds like.:)
     
  9. geshel

    geshel

    Oct 2, 2001
    Seattle
    OK. Cool. It would help when you ask that you mention you've been over what you could find and that didn't do it for you.

    The question is also quite different if you're talking about a neck-through or a bolt-on design.
     
  10. Poplar is an underrated wood...it has nice acoustic properties. I know it's cheap...but you can't diss a MIM jazz's tone.
     
  11. rickbass

    rickbass Supporting Member

    If you're thinking a neck-through - I originally tried to get a snakewood fingerboard put on a figured rock maple neck with a purpleheart center. Unfortunately, no decent snakewood was available at the time. :(

    But a wood source I used most recently came up with some snakewood fingerboards - [​IMG]

    All the woods I selected can be seen in poor pics here at my bass construction album - http://www.imagestation.com/album/?id=4292399439&idx=0

    Not that those I selected are "the best" combinations.....just the best I could come up with for the tones I want from the thing. Other woods do different jobs better. But it will look pretty breathtaking. The cocobolo top is made with an exhibition grade board I found (my board) -
    [​IMG]

    Basswood would make a great center of a body. A body top of holly and ebony would be snazzy.
     
  12. Where can you get thoe exhibition grade woods? Anybody got sources and contact info?

    I am in the process of building a P bass, looking for exotic tops.

    Does anybody know how much a blank Coco Bolo Exhibition Grade cost? Like the one above?

    Thanks
     
  13. rickbass

    rickbass Supporting Member

    Mod - My experience with many wood sources is;

    - A board of cocobolo, like the one I have, (pictured above), is about $170. incl. shipping from Oregon to N.C. The thing is, the wood dealer had 5 other people interested in that board, so it was sort of an auction and a matter of who could put the money where their mouth was immediately. The trick is finding a dealer who has that quality.

    - Don't think what they show at their websites is all they have. They get wood in all the time and they haven't had time to advertise it.
    In other words, if you see a wood source with some woods that rock, contact them (preferably by phone) and ask, "Has anything exotic come in that would be suitable for an electric bass?" That is how I came up with fiddleback mirindiba for my fingerboard.

    - Look out for dealers who use special lighting or camera lens filters to make their woods appear much better than they are, or, use dyes in their woods.
    How can you tell who does this? Find as many pictures as you can of the wood you are after. If one dealer's pictures look unreal, be suspicious and demand the right to return the wood for a full refund if it is not as depicted.
    But don't be too skeptical. When my luthier looked at that board of cocobolo I bought, he said it was so outrageous, it appeared dyed. But after checking it out, he said it was the real deal!

    - Finally, check out eBay. If you know the right questions to ask, there are often some outrageous woods selling for good prices. The main questions to ask, IME, are;

    - Is the wood is properly dried ?
    - Can I return it for a full refund if my luthier finds it is unacceptable?
     
  14. geshel

    geshel

    Oct 2, 2001
    Seattle
    I've seen great looking tops (eg Sei) of both woods before, so that sounds cool. The picture of the thuya looks like some sort of open sore however! :eek:

    :)
     
  15. The thuya when sliced and sanded and polished, looks awesome/
     
  16. swamp ash boddy,
    wenge nekk,
    ebony fingerbored,

    speak clearly and carry a good stick!!!:D
     
  17. geshel

    geshel

    Oct 2, 2001
    Seattle
    Oh yeah! I know what you mean. I was thinking about thuya (and cocobolo, and amboyna burl, and ... :)) before deciding to go with the shedua on my next one.
     
  18. Pic of shedua? Love to see it!