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Complete Idiot's Guide to Music Theory

Discussion in 'Music Theory [DB]' started by Bass Barrister, Mar 6, 2008.


  1. Bass Barrister

    Bass Barrister

    Nov 4, 2004
    Chicago
    Has anyone seen or used the Complete Idiot's Guide to Music Theory, 2d ed., by Michael Miller? This is advertised as your basic "starter" theory book and comes witha basic ear training audio CD. It has received very good reviews on Amazon.com but I could not find any mention of it here.

    I've been playing or singing music for the last 45 years of my life, and have taken lessons in voice, cello, piano, euphonium/tuba, trombone, and, currently, bass. In the course of these activities, I've picked up some knowledge but often get lost when the discussion turns to cords, modes, progressions, and the like. At some point, I may want to take a basic theory class or two. For now, however, I'm looking for a "primer" that covers the basics.

    Here's some basic information about the book:

    http://www.molehillgroup.com/music_theory.htm
     
  2. Menacewarf

    Menacewarf

    Mar 9, 2007
    Oregon
    I've not used the book you mentioned but can recommend, "Edly's Music Theory for Practical People" by Ed Roseman. It has all the meat and potatoes peppered with a personal touch that really helps the readability. A great initial book on the subject.
     
  3. I have the book and use it for the basics and ear training. Like most resources it works if you apply it. User friendly and easy to follow. My goal is to arrange and be able to play on the fly in jams so good theory gounding helps alot.
     
  4. In addition to the Complete Idiot's book, which does look pretty good, there are several free online resources for ear training.

    Music Theory.net

    Learn2hear.org

    Good Ear

    I believe all three of these has various training exercises, from beginner interval studies right up through scale, chord, cadence, etc identification. The advantage they have over a CD is that they're random so you won't wind up memorizing the exercises like you might on a CD.

    Keep up the good work, you're on the right track!
     

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