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Compression

Discussion in 'Amps and Cabs [BG]' started by manmusic, Mar 18, 2006.


  1. manmusic

    manmusic

    Mar 14, 2006
    South West - UK
    Some amps have it, others don't. Is this feature a must? A friend swears by this little button on his Trace rig and says it makes all the difference to his sound. I'm considering either a Trace or Ashdown [which doesn't have it] - is this important or not? I'm getting rid of my Boogie rig as it's just too big for my purposes now [too lazy to lug it 'round really!]
     
  2. I think in the modern days having the compressor isn't as much of a nessecity[sp]. personally, i love having the compressor near full on my Trace! Makes a big difference.

    Best thing to do is try it out. Naturally, i'd suggest you buy a Trace ;) But you could always buy a compressor pedal to go along with an amp w/o a compressor.
     
  3. bongomania

    bongomania Gold Supporting Member Commercial User

    Oct 17, 2005
    PDX, OR
    owner, OVNIFX and OVNILabs
    Yeah, there are so many really good compressor pedals out there (see the reviews thread in the effects forum) that there's really no need to choose one amp over another just because of an onboard comp.
     
  4. 62bass

    62bass

    Apr 3, 2005
    I've used compression in the past. I don't find it a must. In fact I don't like it at all. With a good bass, amp and proper technique you don't need it and I find it degrades the sound, particularly most of the ones found on bass amps. Even the high end rackmount and pedal units I've used degraded my sound.

    Recording, sometimes just a touch for the final mix.
     
  5. billfitzmaurice

    billfitzmaurice Commercial User

    Sep 15, 2004
    New Hampshire
    Owner, Bill Fitzmaurice Loudspeaker Design
    There isn't a professional recording studio in the world that doesn't use compression. Vintage Pultec compressors are as highly prized as vintage Neumann mics. A good compressor can do wonders for your sound, That being said, you won't find a $1k compressor built into a $500 amp. If you want a good compressor get one, but don't buy an amp because it has a (possibly cheap) compressor built in.
     
  6. thedoctor

    thedoctor

    Jun 20, 2005
    I was talked into using a tube compressor onstage by a sound dude to keep the quiet parts up front and kill my "booms". After playing with it I found some very cool effects by changing the attack ratio and levels. After about two months, sound dude wanted his compressor back and I suffered severe decompression, hence "the bends". The push-button compressors built in to an amp just don't have enough knobs to show you what a good compressor can do. Buy the amp you like regardless of the built-in comp. Then go buy an outboard unit and screw around with it.
     
  7. seamonkey

    seamonkey

    Aug 6, 2004
    Go out and try multi-band compression.
    Truly amazing. Lets you keep dynamics on the high end, and compress the low. Excellent for slapping.
    I have a feeling the on board compressors would be more useful if they only compressed the low end.
     
  8. jokerjkny

    jokerjkny

    Jan 19, 2002
    NY / NJ / PA
    Oooo, love a nice multiband action...

    but yea, some amps have great compression other dont. have to try before you buy.
     
  9. kjones

    kjones Supporting Member

    Dec 4, 2004
    Maryland
    I don't think anyone has asked yet, but do you slap? I find that slappers are much more in need of compression than those who don't.
     
  10. Poon

    Poon

    May 20, 2003
    Los Angeles, CA
    I recently started using compression live. I still have to tweak with my DBX 160A a bit, but I really like it. Compression really allows you to get balance between everything. I'm finding it a must have for some rooms and some rigs.
     
  11. maxbass

    maxbass

    May 22, 2002
    Milano Italy
    IMHO built in compressors are quite crappy, and most often they're actually limiters, not real compressors.
    This is the case with my Eden, and the same was with my former SWR.
    The dual compressor that I had years ago on my Trace Elliot was indeed good.

    Please don't get rid of your Mesa Boogie, you'll regret it!
     
  12. ibz

    ibz

    Apr 14, 2005
    Columbus, OH
    If you like the Trace Elliot Compression from their heads, just get there SMX or Acostic Dual Band compressor pedals (both sound the same from my comparison). These pedals would allow you to use that great compression sound with any rig you please.

    I use one in my rig from time to time and it sounds great.
     
  13. manmusic

    manmusic

    Mar 14, 2006
    South West - UK
    Yeah, I fully agree - but it's just a real pain to lug around. The 400+ isn't so bad, it's the 1516BE full range single cab which is the problem. Such a hassle putting seats down in cars and getting the thing in the back [we don't all drive monster SUV's here in the UK!] whereas two smaller cabs would be much easier and fit on the back seats no problem. So should I keep the head and go for smaller cabs then? A friend has advised against the Ashdown Mini stuff and instead recommended the EBS NEO 2x10/2x12 but they are v.expensive. Hartke cheap by comparison! Any recommendations appreciated.:help: