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Confused As Usual

Discussion in 'Amps and Cabs [BG]' started by DooWop14, Sep 7, 2008.


  1. DooWop14

    DooWop14

    Mar 30, 2008
    :help::confused:Ok... here comes another dumb question but here goes. I've got two 8 ohm cabinets and a 4 ohm amp. I know I have to connect them in series to get the effect of four ohms from the two cabs. Do I connect the head to the cabs independently via the two outputs on the head or do I connect the head to one cab and then the second cab to the first one? Sometimes I feel like such a dope! :confused::bag:
     
  2. bongomania

    bongomania Commercial User

    Oct 17, 2005
    PDX, OR
    owner, OVNIFX and OVNILabs
    Usually both methods work the same. There are some odd exceptions, but not common enough to worry about.
     
  3. Revvv

    Revvv

    Oct 31, 2007
    Georgia
    Hook the cabs up however you would like. You will be fine. The amp will automatically drop to 4 ohms.
     
  4. DooWop14

    DooWop14

    Mar 30, 2008
    Believe it or not, that's exactly what I thought. But I was told (by someone who's obviously dumber than I) that there was a difference and that if I didn't do it right, I could fry my amp. It turns out that someone else is the dope, this time, and not me.

    Thanks for the advise! :bassist:
     
  5. spode master

    spode master

    Jan 21, 2007
    And just for hopefully a little clarification, if you daisy chain the speaker cabs instead of running from the two jacks from the back of the amp it will still be parallel (Running from the amps jacks is better in my oppinion).

    The only way you can run two seperate cabs in series (would give you 16 ohms not 4) you would either have to do some fancy wiring at the cabinets jacks, or make a funny looking 3 jack external cable with some fancy wiring.

    The reason that going out of the 2 jacks on the amp is a little better, is because you have 2 seperate conduits like Water pipes for power (preferably of even length), they don't have any effect on each other.

    Daisy chaining however means one of the cabinets is going to have a longer cable between it and the amp.

    This will mean the second cab will get a teeny tiny bit less power because it has effectively a longer cable infront of it. This means a little more resistance.

    Not really a big deal because instrument speaker cables are normally fairly short. So the diff will be negligable.

    But IMO, there is a best way between the two options.
     
  6. doktorfeelgood

    doktorfeelgood layin' it down like pavement Supporting Member

    Not knowing how the jacks are wired in your cabs, your best bet is to plug each cab into your amp then you'll be sure that the amp is running on a 4 ohm load. If your cabs are 8 ohms and the jacks are wired in parallel and you daisy chain from amp to cab1 to cab2, the amp will see a 4 ohm load. If the jacks happen to be wired in series when you daisy chain the cabs the amp will see a 16 ohm load. While technically not OK, one step in resitance is relatively safe, i.e. 4-8/8-4 or 8-16/16-8, while two steps (4-16/16-4) is not a good idea. Especially if it's a solid state amp. If you're sure the cabs are 8 ohms each and the amp is running at 4 ohms when using two 8 ohm cabs, just plug each cab into the amp and you'll be fine. )-(
     
  7. spode master

    spode master

    Jan 21, 2007
    What!?

    What exactly does that mean (4-16/16-4). It doesn't represent math that would end up with any impedance value.

    Don't take that last step off the 13th floor elevator.

    If you parallel 16 and 4 ohms you will get ~3.2 ohms, if you series them you will get 20 ohms.

    Solid state amps are usually happy as clams driving up to infinate impedance, not to keen on the low impedance.

    Tube amps are the ones that don't like the Hi impedance loads so much Don't quote me on this but I think its better to run a tube amp into an short, Vs an open.

    I don't think any comercial speaker cab (pairs) have a series wiring configuration you would have to do that on purpose and the cabinets wouldn't work unless they were correctly wired together.
     
  8. DooWop14

    DooWop14

    Mar 30, 2008
    :confused::confused::confused::confused::confused::confused::confused::confused::confused::confused::confused:

    Why is there never a simple answer??????
     
  9. bongomania

    bongomania Commercial User

    Oct 17, 2005
    PDX, OR
    owner, OVNIFX and OVNILabs
    Don't worry about all that 16/4 business, (a) it didn't make any sense to me or spode either, and (b) he was only talking about speaker cabs with series-wired jacks, which are rare. Odds are very good that the jacks on your cabs are parallel, just like the outputs on the back of your amp. Meaning for all practical purposes there is a simple answer, which is that it will work either way. If you're at all concerned, just contact the manufacturer or read the manual of the cabs to determine that the jacks are parallel wired.
     
  10. DooWop14

    DooWop14

    Mar 30, 2008
    Thanks
     
  11. Munjibunga

    Munjibunga Total Hyper-Elite Member Gold Supporting Member

    May 6, 2000
    San Diego (when not at Groom Lake)
    Independent Contractor to Bass San Diego
    Actually, you have to connect them in parallel, which will automatically happen if you connect them either way that you've described. Either way is fine.
     
  12. Munjibunga

    Munjibunga Total Hyper-Elite Member Gold Supporting Member

    May 6, 2000
    San Diego (when not at Groom Lake)
    Independent Contractor to Bass San Diego
    See above.
     
  13. DooWop14

    DooWop14

    Mar 30, 2008

    I realized my mistake after posting. But since no one else noticed, I figured I'd leave it be. Every one knew what I was talking about.
     
  14. doktorfeelgood

    doktorfeelgood layin' it down like pavement Supporting Member

    I apologize if I confused you even more. )-(
     
  15. DooWop14

    DooWop14

    Mar 30, 2008

    As I said, everyone seemed to know what I was talking about so I just left it as it was. Now your post, on the other hand, really got my head spinning. ;) But I actually looked it over again, vvveeerrrryyyy ssssllllllooooooowwwwwwlllllyyyyyy. And I can honestly say I completely understand what you were saying. It really doesn't apply to my case here but it was informative. :)

    Let's see now if I can get about thirty or so technical responses from this simple question.

    I'm running a Fender bassman 400. I don't have the footswitch for remote on/off of the equalizer. I've been looking for a footswitch on the net, ebay, GC, MF, etc., but haven't been able to find one. There are many single switches out there but they're all identified to operate other functions on other Fender amps. Is any Fender single button footswitch able to perform this function? Or do I have to find the one specifically made for this amplifier for this function?

    Ok, guys, go to town and try to confuse me even more! :hyper:
     
  16. doktorfeelgood

    doktorfeelgood layin' it down like pavement Supporting Member

    My guess is that you'd have to find the correct footswitch for that amp and that function. I'll give you a number to call Fender and you might be able to get help there...
    800-488-1818 Let me know how you make out...)-(
     

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