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confused

Discussion in 'Amps and Cabs [BG]' started by Jon R, Nov 21, 2003.


  1. OK... I've been known to over-analyze things, but so what. Anyway, is there a proper order when making tone adjustments? I mean, my amp has active bass and treble (cut & boost), a passive mid (boost only), and a three band parametric EQ (cut & boost). My speaker cab has a horn crossover adjustment, and my bass has active bass, mid and treble (cut & boost).

    My assumption has always been to start with the amp set flat with no EQ and use a bit of speaker cab horn to ensure it doesn't overload the crossover. Then adjust your bass for overall tone, adjust the amps bass, mid and treble to match your taste/music style and then adjust the EQ to match the room or 'till it feels right... Lastly, add the cabs horn for additional sparkle, if required.

    I wouldn't even bring this up, but I probably have my head stuck you-know-where about this whole thing and am doing it all wrong.
     
  2. JMX

    JMX Vorsprung durch Technik

    Sep 4, 2000
    Cologne, Germany
    Sounds ok to me.
     
  3. I've noticed that a number of TBer's recommend setting your bass cranked to the max... volume and tone controls. It's supposed to produce a better tone. My assumption was that with everything cranked you'd get a VERY hot signal and could easily put the pre into clipping.
     
  4. ChenNuts44

    ChenNuts44

    Nov 18, 2001
    Davenport, IA
    When it comes to diming the controls, I'm sure the reference was to a passive bass.
     
  5. JMX

    JMX Vorsprung durch Technik

    Sep 4, 2000
    Cologne, Germany
    Yup, that applies to passive, that's also the reason for the "English setting" on Marshall amps. The old Marshalls had passive EQ and sounded best with the EQ off, which was with everything on 10.
     
  6. Thanks for the input. At least I've got the bass (guitar) part cleared up.
     
  7. Craig Garfinkel

    Craig Garfinkel

    Aug 25, 2000
    Hartford, CT
    Endorsing Artist: Sadowsky Guitars
    I typically start with everything flat on my bass (Ken Smith, active) and EQ the amp to the room. Then I'll make minor adjustments to the EQ on the bass if need be. My amp doesn't have a parametric (Aguilar DB750), and I'm not a parametric fan for just this very reason. Too confusing, too many knobs to tweak. I don't wanna "tweak", I wanna dial in and go!

    That's why I never liked the SWR heads. I'd tweak forever and never get a decent sound. And the aural exciter? Aaaaargh! Then I discovered the "suggested settings" on the SWR site...and bingo! Perhaps there's something like that on your amp's website?

    Lots of players love having options and more options, and I can dig, that's cool. But for me, I go the KISS route. No, I don't wear makeup and regurgitate fake blood, I mean Keep It Simple, Stupid. :bassist:
     
  8. Thanks Craig, I'll give it a shot with my bass set flat.

    So what didn't you like about SWR's aural exciter? Would that apply to the Aphex unit as well?
     
  9. Craig Garfinkel

    Craig Garfinkel

    Aug 25, 2000
    Hartford, CT
    Endorsing Artist: Sadowsky Guitars
    Well, added to the parametric EQ it was just one to many variables in the sound. Increasing or decreasing the level of the enhancer changed the tone shape to where I'd want to futz with the EQ, then back to the a.e., and back again, and on and on and on and on.

    Too much tweaking (for me)!
     
  10. notabob

    notabob

    Sep 20, 2003
    cincinnati ohio
    the aphex unit is great. i use the older model 104 w/ big bottom. very simple and easy to opperate. i cant speak for or against the swr, but the aphex is definitly a welcomed addition to any rig.