Discussion in 'Technique [BG]' started by Twistad, Apr 6, 2004.

  1. Ok so i'm kinda trying to get used to a 6 strings making the move from a 4. So 'm starting to question my old technique which was just alternating my 2 first fingers.

    Also, one thing i'd also like to improve is my speed so that's where i'm starting to think about going 3 fingers. I've tried 32123 but would 321321 be better or any other way?

    Also, how should i place my right hand when playing, i'd usually just sit on my pickup but when playing on my 6 it gets really tough to play the higuer strings??

    Oh this is also my first post here so HI.
  2. Yo.

    I'd say 321321 would generally be simpler. However, if you feel simpler the other way, by all means, go for it. I personally play 321321 when I try the three finger dealie.

    About the 6 string trouble, try moving your thumb around. Don't always leave it on the pickup, but change the anchor point. For example, if you're playing on the high C string, rest your thumb on the D or G string. That's what I do.
  3. Finger Blister

    Finger Blister

    Jul 8, 2003
    6 strings = 400% increased chance of tendonitis.
  4. rhinestone


    Jan 5, 2004
    When I used three fingers (now I use four), I used to go 1-2-3-2 for time signatures of fours (4/4, 2/4) and 1-2-3-1-2-3 for time signatures of threes (3/4, 6/8).
  5. DaemonBass


    Mar 29, 2004
    Sacramento, CA
    Good Lord man, I was just thinking about my 5 string Peavey. NEVER buy a 6 string peavey unless it's some new age wood cus my 5 string is SUPER HEAVY!! Sweet ass neck though...

    At any rate, I can't comment on 3 finger thing cus I use 2 and 2 works for a lot of folks on any # of strings. Note, that is playing normally not some guitar adapted fingerstyle thing. As for thumb placement, on a 5 string, I keep my thumb on the pickup for playing B string, then thumb goes on B string when I'm playing E, A strings. Then thumb anchors on E string for D and G usually. I'm sure you can adapt something for the 6-stringer. Anyways, the priniciple is this: the farther away your thumb is anchored from the strings you are playing, the more stretched out your hand is, and your fingers will have to reach more to compensate. This reach is unfavorable because your fingers lose the natural curve inwards that they normally have ... unless playing with rigid fingers is your thing...