Consensus of $500 basses

Discussion in 'Basses [BG]' started by deathbloomslife, Aug 14, 2005.

  1. So, I'm still in the hunt for a new bass, trying to renew and rekindle my playing a little bit. I've looked and searched quite a bit, and it looks like sadly, I'll be buying a Korean bass... again. Anway, the leaders in the pack are Schecter Stilletto Elite, Spector Legend, Peavey Cirrus BXP, and a Tribute by G&L L-2000. I'm also thinking of going used, but I don't think that I'll luck out and attain an EBMM or Warwick for $500 U.S. simoleans. I'm looking for a 4 string bass, that I can use for some aggressive modern rock like Staind, Chevelle, Rob Zombie, Otep-ish type stuff. I do want to be able to get a relevently nice slap sound out of it.

    So, any other ideas?

    ~Ryan :help:
  2. tplyons


    Apr 6, 2003
    Madison, NJ
    Used SUB or Warwick Rockbass?
  3. I agree with Tplyons on the Warwick Rockbass.

    For what they're worth, they are really aggressive and have that real Warwick-esque tonality, considering the electronics, body shape, so on, so forth is based on the more expensive deal. The Rockbass would also fit well into the genre of music you'd wish to cover.
  4. brothernewt

    brothernewt Some people call me the stormtrooper of love...

    Apr 13, 2004
    Happyrock, OR
    used Fender MIJ 75 reissue jazz... you know, if you like jazz basses.
  5. BartmanPDX

    BartmanPDX Supporting Member

    Used Fender Geddy Lee, used Musicman SUB, or used Lakland 44-01.

    For $500 I'd avoid looking at new basses. $500 can buy a decent used bass, but it's not enough to get a good new bass, unless you luck out and get just the right MIM Fender Jazz or P bass.

    $500 seems to be the separating line between adequate and good basses in the used market in a general sense, depending obviously, on the individual bass.

    Warwick is also worth looking into. I love the tone but hate the feel personally, but others love the feel -- it's up to the individual.

    If you have to, wait a month or two to get more cash to get the bass you want. There's no point in blowing $500 on a bass you're not completely happy with. $500 is a considerable amount of money for most people -- take your time, play as many basses as possible (ignoring setup -- string height, etc., which can be adjusted -- pay attention to neck thickness, fingerboard curvature, tone, etc -- things that are can't be changed in a setup, but are a fundamental part of the bass), and go with what works for you. Even if you have to drive a long ways to try a lot of basses, and deal with asinine salesmen, the experience of trying as many options as possible will pay dividends when it comes to picking out just what works for you. You can always ask the folks here what they would recommend if you like the neck feel on bass X, but the tone on bass Y, etc..
  6. Simball


    Mar 26, 2005
    Portland, Oregon
    +1 :cool:
  7. A9X


    Dec 27, 2003
    Sinny, Oztraya
    Well said, and good advice.