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Constructing Chord Progressions

Discussion in 'General Instruction [BG]' started by Correlli, Nov 18, 2005.


  1. Correlli

    Correlli

    Apr 2, 2004
    New Zealand
    I found this forumla in a guitar book. I'm assuming it's basic on harmony theory. I find it quite useful. maybe some of my friends at talkbass might find it useful too. :)

    - An I chord can change to any other chord.
    - An II chord can change to any other chord except I.
    - An III chord can change to any other chord except I or VII.
    - An IV chord can change to any other chord.
    - An V chord can change to any other chord expect II or VII.
    - An VI chord can change to any other chord expect I or VII.
    - An VII chord can change to any other chord expect the II or IV.

    Edit: The Guitar Handbook by Ralph Denyer
     
  2. JimmyM

    JimmyM Supporting Member

    Apr 11, 2005
    Apopka, FL
    Endorsing: Ampeg Amps, EMG Pickups
    I'm going to use this list to write a new song, and I'm going to violate every single rule on it ;)
     
  3. Bassist4Life

    Bassist4Life

    Dec 17, 2004
    Buffalo, NY
    This just seems like a list of limitations. What style of music are these "rules" made for? I would go with what sounds and feels right.

    Joe
     
  4. spc

    spc

    Apr 10, 2004
    South of Boston
    This should get some interesting responses...
     
  5. WalterBush

    WalterBush

    Feb 27, 2005
    Yuma, Az
    Ah shoot, I didn't realize. Thelonius Monk's ghost is going to be pissed.
     
  6. Eli M.

    Eli M. Life's like a movie, write your own ending

    Jul 24, 2004
    New York, NY
    Some of those just don't make sense. I can see it as a list of where certain chords have a tendency to go, but I would stop short of saying you "can" or "can't" do certain things.
     
  7. Phil Smith

    Phil Smith Mr Sumisu 2 U

    May 30, 2000
    Peoples Republic of Brooklyn
    Creator of: iGigBook for Android/iOS
    I think what that text may be trying to show is what chord progressions are strong and which are weak. Moving up a second, fourth or sixth or down a seventh, fifth or third from the root are considered strong progressions.
     
  8. I've seen a few of these chord maps, and they never sound any good, they always sound better of you just do the opposite of what they say. YMMV
     
  9. lowerclef

    lowerclef

    Nov 10, 2003
    This chart is just flat-out wrong, in my opinion.
     
  10. The Clap

    The Clap

    Jan 5, 2004
    Scottsdale, AZ
    You don't say?

    Strictly speaking, taking any book's advice of right and wrong notes and chords is ridiculous. You have to understand the sound of harmony, and be able to hear what's going on in your own head. It beats following some guitarist's definition of the right and wrong places to put your hands in every case.
     
  11. jadesmar

    jadesmar

    Feb 17, 2003
    Ottawa, ON
    Are all these numerals meant to be capitalized? What kind of funky key are you playing in, man?
     
  12. C-5KO

    C-5KO

    Mar 9, 2005
    Toronto, Canada

    Ahhh... I get it. That's why every song guitar players write sound like I - IV - V.

    :p
     
  13. not sure what the book is getting at, but the four most common chord progessions (in order from most to least) are:

    Up a fourth
    Down a Third
    Up a Second
    Up a Fifth

    edit: b10
    edit 2: up a second = down a 7th; down a third = up a 6th
     
  14. slybass3000

    slybass3000 Banned

    Nov 5, 2004
    Montréal,Qc,Canada
    Good one!!!

    SB

    PS: this list is so off!!!
    Sorry
     
  15. Phil Smith

    Phil Smith Mr Sumisu 2 U

    May 30, 2000
    Peoples Republic of Brooklyn
    Creator of: iGigBook for Android/iOS
    A gazillion tunes are I - IV - V.