Controls and necks on the G&L L series

Discussion in 'Basses [BG]' started by barroso, Oct 3, 2002.

  1. barroso


    Aug 16, 2000
    I am interested in the control layout of the G&L L2000, ASAT and L2500.

    which is the function of each knob and mini toggle both in active and passive mode?

    is the complicate layout and preamp reliable?

    About the neck i am interested in the biCut technology. is this proved as a reliable technology for cutting necks? is this a "new" tech or is this from the start of the G&L?

    thanks for helping!!
  2. gweimer


    Apr 6, 2000
    Columbus, OH
    You can find a schematic, with some explanation at:
    Guitars By Leo
  3. craigb

    craigb Supporting Member

    All controls work in both active & passive mode:

    3 toggles from closest to neck to bridge (functions listed from closest to neck position to closest to bridge position):

    - pickup selector (neck only/both/bridge only)
    - series/parallel selector
    - active+treble boost/active/passive

    3 knobs from closest to neck to bridge:

    - volume
    - treble cut
    - bass cut

    I'm doing this from memory and can't remember if my order on the bass/treble cut knobs is right (but that's easy to make sure of with one in hand).

    Series mode has massive amounts of bass - parallel is more even high-to-low and has more clarity. Passive is more "vintage" while active has more bite (I never use active+treble boost).

    The pickups are voiced with extra bass and treble so passive cut-only eq is all that is needed (it's nice to have the eq in passive mode).

    The bi-cut neck is one of Leo's ideas. It wasn't present at the very start of G&L (the earliest G&Ls have one-piece necks with skunk stripes) but has been there for a while. I don't know if time has proven it as an improvement over one piece necks or not. A lot of it comes down to preference I think - Roger Sadowsky uses 1 piece unreinforced (with graphite - they have truss rods of course) necks, Laklands have graphite reinforcement, other luthiers laminate their necks out of different numbers of pieces and they all produce great instruments.
  4. jpwinters

    jpwinters Guest

    Aug 22, 2002
    Norfolk, Va
    I know that the G&L website says that they invented it, but Peavey was doing that on their T-40's back in 79. They cut the truss rod channel in 2 pieces of wood, stuck the rod in there and glued the 2 pieces together to form 1 neck. They called it a Bi-laminated neck.
  5. embellisher

    embellisher Holy Ghost filled Bass Player Staff Member Supporting Member

    Peavey has a US patent for it. They glued the pieces back together with the grains in different directions, to guard against warping.