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Coping with (involuntary) downsizing

Discussion in 'Off Topic [BG]' started by melikecookies, Mar 13, 2013.


  1. melikecookies

    melikecookies Supporting Member

    Sep 19, 2012
    Maryland
    So I recently was confronted with some financial difficulties, which more than likely will have me selling off a large portion of my gear. I have a nice variety of musical instruments, but I find myself emotionally attached to most of my basses. Though they will be the very last to go, it is highly probable I will end up parting with quite a few. I’d like to get input on those who have gone through this at one time or another, whether from circumstance (financial obligations) or forced situations (theft or significant other demands). Doesn’t necessarily have to be basses, but things you are/were attached to in general. Tips? Best way to go about things? Stories and outcomes?
     
  2. Sneakypete

    Sneakypete

    Jul 22, 2009
    "The more a man owns beyond what he actually uses the more care-worn he becomes" as someone much wiser than me once said. Am I the only one on TB who has just one bass, one head and two cabs? Even so, I'm wondering whether to pull the trigger on a Streamliner and a Neox2 2x12 cab to save weight and space.
     
  3. First of all, keep your chin up, financial hardship (for whatever reason) can be overcome. I was downsized twice in 18 months, and under-employed for another 12 months. My bank account got hit hard, and my family had to make sacrifices. I had to stop doing alot of things that i like to do as did my wife and kids.

    If you take the emotion out of the ownership of "things" (basses, amps, cars etc etc) it will be easier to part with them when and if needed. Sure they will be missed, but there is ussually better "things" out there that you can acquire when the time is right to do so.

    I stopped skiing, golfing and mountain biking and sold my truck to start my family knowing one day, I will return to ski, golf and mountain bike again. Which i have.

    If and when you sell your basses, promise yourself that you'll replace them when the time is right, and if at all possible, keep one base, the least expensive one, to play while you get back on your feet.
     
  4. klejst

    klejst

    Oct 5, 2010
    Nebraska
    I have gone through this a couple times over the last years and it sucks, but you do what you HAVE to do to make it work. It's not worth getting into bigger financial problems. My basses are always the last to go meaning I sell off cabs and amps, etc first because they can be replaced. However, you know what they say is no two basses are the same and that is true hence the better idea to keep basses.
     
  5. MJ5150

    MJ5150 Supporting Member

    Apr 12, 2001
    Olympia, WA
    Remove the personal attachment to your belongings. It's understandable in some cases, like a family heirloom. Other than that, work on being less attached to those items. When you get to that spot and a financial downturn comes your way, you won't be as stressed as you are now.

    -Mike
     
  6. MatticusMania

    MatticusMania LANA! HE REMEMBERS ME!

    Sep 10, 2008
    Pomona, SoCal
    I have 3 basses and a combo amp. I only use one bass, I have the other 2 left over from upgrading. They werent worth selling.
     
  7. This is great advice, and certainly something I need to do too :(
     
  8. MatticusMania

    MatticusMania LANA! HE REMEMBERS ME!

    Sep 10, 2008
    Pomona, SoCal
    Huge +1
     
  9. slobake

    slobake resident ... something Supporting Member

    Sorry to hear you are struggling. I agree with trying to let go of the emotional attachements. In the past I have been offended when someone else couldn't see how valuable my possessions were. On the bright side sometimes making my load lighter feels really good. The less stuff I have the simpler my live is. May it go well for you, can I pray for you about this?
     
  10. UncleFluffy

    UncleFluffy

    Mar 8, 2009
    California
    Head Tinkerer, The Flufflab
    +1

    "is this emotion about things or people?"
     
  11. MJ5150

    MJ5150 Supporting Member

    Apr 12, 2001
    Olympia, WA
    If you're asking me, my answer is things. The OP was lamenting having to sell some bass equipment during his financial hardship.

    slobake......that's what it took for me to start losing my emotional attachment to things, other people not seeing eye to eye with me on value. It took me a few years of thinking they were all ignorant abotu how just valuable and awesome my stuff was, but I came around finally.

    -Mike
     
  12. UncleFluffy

    UncleFluffy

    Mar 8, 2009
    California
    Head Tinkerer, The Flufflab
    Yeah, I was agreeing with you - I meant it as "when you feel bad about selling something, here's a question to ask yourself"

    As ever, it's hard to be both terse and clear on an internet forum :)
     
  13. MJ5150

    MJ5150 Supporting Member

    Apr 12, 2001
    Olympia, WA
    Yep, and I totally missed the point. My mistake. I'm a dork.

    -Mike
     
  14. placedesjardins

    placedesjardins

    May 7, 2012
    Tips? Never sell to pawn shops.
     
  15. 70e.
     
  16. melikecookies

    melikecookies Supporting Member

    Sep 19, 2012
    Maryland
    Thanks for all the kind words and advice, I really do appreciate it… and prayers are always welcome. I’m definitely working on the whole personal attachment thing, but it’s hard when what you have brings you joy and happiness. On the flip side, I have wanted to downsize in general to have a more simplistic lifestyle (not that the one I have is extravagant by any means). I’ve heard many things about pawn shops and often wonder how they are still in business these days, especially with online resources such as craigslist and ebay. Not knocking them by any means though.
     
  17. Jazz Ad

    Jazz Ad Mi la ré sol Supporting Member

    Call your attachment greed rather than emotion, it will help you part with it.
     
  18. Brad Johnson

    Brad Johnson Supporting Member

    Mar 8, 2000
    Gaithersburg, Md
    DR Strings
    This.

    I often get people asking if I'd ever sell this or that and without hesitation I honestly say that should push come to shove, absolutely. While I like what I own, bottom line it's stuff.

    This is why I always consider resale value. I know all too well that I don't have to plan for bad stuff for it to happen anyway. So I'm always anticipating it and now most of what I own is worth more than I have invested. That helps take away some of the sting. I consider myself lucky that I have gear that can help pay the bills in a pinch.
     
  19. Jazz Ad

    Jazz Ad Mi la ré sol Supporting Member

    I'm not overly attached to gear, except for my main bass.
    I'd probably sell the Mrs, kid, cats and house before parting with it.
     
  20. Figjam

    Figjam

    Aug 5, 2003
    Boston, MA
    I don't think you would miss half the stuff as much as you think. Time changes things, especially attachment to physical entities.
     

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