Psst... Ready to join TalkBass and start posting, make new friends, sell your gear, and more?  Register your free account in 30 seconds.

Could someone tell me where the different keys are?

Discussion in 'General Instruction [BG]' started by ahhelpme, Sep 5, 2005.


  1. ahhelpme

    ahhelpme

    Aug 26, 2004
    I know this may sound incredibly stupid, but please bear with me. Could someone explain to me where all the different keys ( ie A, G ,B) are on the fretboard.
    Any help would be greatly appreciated.
    Thanks for reading
     
  2. cowsgomoo

    cowsgomoo gone to Longstanton Spice Museum

    Feb 8, 2003
    UK
    if you're looking for diagrams of where the notes are in all the different scales/keys... i.e. where to put your fingers, there's a useful page here:

    http://www.basstabs.net/basics/scales.asp

    it doesn't give 'major' or 'minor' scales, but uses the modal names 'Ionian' and 'Aeolian' respectively... but apart from that it looks fairly straightforward
     
  3. Bruce Lindfield

    Bruce Lindfield Unprofessional TalkBass Contributor Gold Supporting Member


    Yes it does! So it says things like "melodic minor" etc. and it gives modes for the major scale - just use the first mode if you want a simple major scale.
     
  4. cowsgomoo

    cowsgomoo gone to Longstanton Spice Museum

    Feb 8, 2003
    UK
    I probably should have said 'natural minor' there instead of just 'minor'... it would have been nice for people who arent yet familar with modes to have major/natural minor listed too (or maybe in brackets next to the modal names)

    what I meant was.. if a newbie goes looking for C major scale.. and he knows nothing about modes, he or she probably isn't going to know the modal equivalent name
     
  5. Correlli

    Correlli

    Apr 2, 2004
    New Zealand

    A good one to start with is the C Major Scale.

    The diagram below is the fretboard from the Nut to fret 12.

    0 = notes of C major scale
    | = placeholder
    Code:
        EADG
    N   0000
        ----
    1   0|||
    2   |000
    3   000|
    4   |||0
    5   0000
    6   ||||
    7   0000
    8   00||
    9   ||00
    10  0000
    11  ||||
    12  0000
     
  6. TTSTTTS ???? thats the interval formula for coming up with ur scales/keys right?
    T = tone
    S= semi tone
     
  7. Correlli

    Correlli

    Apr 2, 2004
    New Zealand
    The diagram is a representation of a fretboard, and where the diatonic notes occur on the fretboard.

    But you are right, TTSTTTS is another way of representing the sequence of notes.

    There is also the Roman Numeral System:

    I-II-III-IV-V-VI-VII

    And the Nashville system (not 100% sure on that one):

    1-2-3-4-5-6-7
     
  8. Those three don't really show the same thing. The latter two show sequences of scale degrees, with no info on their spacing, and the tone/semitone notation shows the spacing between them. So does something like "root, major second, major third, perfect fourth, p5, M6, M7, octave", or the fretboard diagram above.
     
  9. Correlli

    Correlli

    Apr 2, 2004
    New Zealand
    That's 5 ways of visually showing a scale.

    And if you use: C-D-E-F-G-A-B, that makes 6!


    It's no wonder I get confused sometimes.
     
  10. ahhelpme

    ahhelpme

    Aug 26, 2004
    are arpeggios useful when playing with other musicians?
     
  11. cowsgomoo

    cowsgomoo gone to Longstanton Spice Museum

    Feb 8, 2003
    UK
    loads of bass lines are based on arpeggios, or bits of arpeggios like root - fifth- octave

    yer typical 'rock n roll' bass line often did something like ' 1 - 3 - 5 -3 ' over the chords

    in fact as a bass player your job is basically to outline the rhythm and harmony... most of the time using single notes... so arpeggios are about as fundamental to bass playing as it gets
     
  12. Correlli

    Correlli

    Apr 2, 2004
    New Zealand
    Tableture and standard notation - that makes 8 ways of visually showing a scale.
     
  13. TTSTTTS is for major though
    TSTTTST for minor?
    TSTTTSS for natural minor???
     
  14. dlloyd

    dlloyd zzzzzzzzzzzzzzz

    Apr 21, 2004
    Scotland
    The first one is major.
    Second one is the dorian mode
    Natural minor is TSTTSTT
     
  15. slapnuts

    slapnuts

    Aug 9, 2005
    Marietta, GA
    Follow this pattern for all major scales. You can translate to different strings if you want to.

    Start on an open or any fret where you can go one octave higher from that note(12 frets higher), play, skip a fret, play, skip a fret, play, play next fret, skip a fret, play, skip a fret, play, skip a fret, play, play next fret. Just reverse for the fall.

    Pattern for all scales, major at least. This statement has not been aproved by the FDA. Use at your own risk.
     
  16. slapnuts

    slapnuts

    Aug 9, 2005
    Marietta, GA
    Oh yeah, arpeggio(sp?) are the first, third, fifth, eigth, fifth, third, and first note of any scale.


    Remember to kiss a llama daily
     
  17. Bryan R. Tyler

    Bryan R. Tyler TalkBass: Usurping My Practice Time Since 2002 Staff Member Administrator Gold Supporting Member

    May 3, 2002
    Connecticut
    No, they're not. Root, 3rd, and 5th (8th is just the octave) is the arpeggiation of just the Major scale.

    If you use Major7 scale, you'd play the root, 3rd, 5th, and 7th of the scale.

    If you use the Minor6 scale, you'd play the root, b3rd, 5th, and 6th of the scale. etc., etc.


    The notes you play depends on the scale, and they change between most of the scales.


    Sounds like you've been kissing too many llamas.
     
  18. Arpeggios are based on chords, not scales. You play notes from a chord in sequence rather than all at once. The current chord is usually a good choice, and the notes you play depend (mostly) on it.
     
  19. Bryan R. Tyler

    Bryan R. Tyler TalkBass: Usurping My Practice Time Since 2002 Staff Member Administrator Gold Supporting Member

    May 3, 2002
    Connecticut
    You're right- I got mixed up there for a moment.
     
  20. slapnuts

    slapnuts

    Aug 9, 2005
    Marietta, GA
    What? That is the way some old guy taught me to remember it, at least. Yes, I know arpeggios are based on chords, but that is an easy way to play an arpeggio on a scale.