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Crap! I've hit sealer!

Discussion in 'Luthier's Corner' started by Schizoid75, Jul 4, 2005.


  1. Schizoid75

    Schizoid75

    Apr 27, 2005
    Columbus, OH
    I thought everything was going so well. I stripped all the paint off my cheapo Spirit Steinberger. Slick as a whistle. I mixed up my aniline dye and prepared to give it a light coat, raising the grain so I could sand it back down again. Only nothing happened. Finally, I figured out that this thing had some kind of sealer coat on it that was preventing my dye from penetrating. I could see the desired results on some of the horns and corners where I had really gotten down to bare wood.

    So my question is what's the quickest way to get through this crap? I'm sanding like a madman, but it seems to be twice as thick as the original paint. Any chemical I can use to remove the sealer?

    Thanks!
     
  2. FBB Custom

    FBB Custom TalkBass Pro Commercial User

    Jan 26, 2002
    Maryland
    Owner: FBB Bass Works
    Are you going to spray over the analine? Why not just mix some of the dye into your finish and shoot a couple of tinted coats before you shoot the clear? Or are you doing rattle-can?
     
  3. Schizoid75

    Schizoid75

    Apr 27, 2005
    Columbus, OH
    None of the above, actually. I'm a complete newbie at this, but here was my plan. Get down to bare wood, hand rub the dye until the desire color is reached, sanding after each coat. Rub on a coat of Zinnser shellac to seal the dye, then do multiple coats of Tru Oil on top of that until it looks done to me. Not a good idea? Those are the supplies I've got right now. If I changed plans, all that would go to waste, plus I don't have access to any spray equipment.
     
  4. FBB Custom

    FBB Custom TalkBass Pro Commercial User

    Jan 26, 2002
    Maryland
    Owner: FBB Bass Works
    It seems like I've heard of people doing this but I don't understand the idea of sealing and then oiling. The idea with oil is that it's supposed to penetrate into the wood. So if you seal it, then the oil can't penetrate and sets up on top.

    Maybe some finishing expert can step in and help me out here but I think that (a) you could mix the analine dye into the shellac and that might set up on top of the sealer that's there. This might depend on the existing sealer and the fact that you have sanded through in spots might make it tricky. Or (b) you could sand out the sealer (no sub for elbow grease) and skip the shellac and just tru-oil the heck out of it over the dye.
     
  5. Schizoid75

    Schizoid75

    Apr 27, 2005
    Columbus, OH
    Well, no one seems to want to chime in on this one. I read that the dye may bleed with only oil on top. The shellac was supposed to "set" the dye and ensure that it stayed on the bass, not on me. That part made sense to me, but like you, I could see how the oil would not penetrate well after the shellac went on. Perhaps if no one else jumps in I'll start a new topic on that one.
     
  6. PasdaBeer

    PasdaBeer

    Nov 2, 2002
    Santa Rosa California
    SandStorm Designs
    once the dye is dry, you souldbe good to oil on top.

    personaly, with dye, i think i poly or shellac finish would look much better.
     
  7. FBB Custom

    FBB Custom TalkBass Pro Commercial User

    Jan 26, 2002
    Maryland
    Owner: FBB Bass Works
    In my experience the dye can and might leech up into the oil. Among the issues is wiping on the oil some of the dye will end up in your rag. The dyes also will react to UV exposure and so the more UV inhibitors you can get into a finish the better.

    Shellac can make a nice finish but it does break down in alcohol. So keep your drinks away from it.

    I should also add that hard maple does not drink up dye as readily as some other woods. Patience will be important as you apply the dye.