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Craziest Bass Wirings?

Discussion in 'Pickups & Electronics [BG]' started by PortlandBass77, Jun 10, 2014.


  1. YES

    15 vote(s)
    55.6%
  2. NO

    8 vote(s)
    29.6%
  3. No hablo espanol

    1 vote(s)
    3.7%
  4. Carrots make good conductors....

    3 vote(s)
    11.1%
  1. So ever sense I have experienced the amazingness of the Peavey T-40, I got to thinking there must be offer weird wirings or pickup combos out there. So far I have thought of a P bass with 3 P pickups, each with a series parallel switch and a volume pot: http://www.talkbass.com/threads/is-this-schematic-correct.1081746/#post-15989374 and a bass with 3 MM style each with a 3 way switch for south coil only, both coils, and north coil only. Anyone have any other crazy bass wiring ideas?
     
  2. I threw a Dan Armstrong hotwire (with original pickups) on a Fender VI... usually run it as a big, fat 3-bucker. If they had wired the bass like this, I believe it would have been more popular.
     

    Attached Files:

    PortlandBass77 likes this.
  3. My vote goes for NO. The more complicated you get, the greater the chance that something is going to fail, and typically, the less practical. Not to mention the more work it is to troubleshoot a problem, and the more labor is involved in wiring. There is good reason that you rarely see anything fancy on production instruments.

    Additionally, it's very common for players to get all excited about wiring a bass to have fifty seven combinations of switching schemes and six pots and three outputs and four pickups and so on, only to find that there is no real benefit to any of it.
     
    xOriginalNinjax and ddnidd1 like this.
  4. If we must include guitars, my favorite I have tried is by far the HSS Strat 7 way + split humbucker mods:
     
  5. IMO, every Strat should have a Neck+Bridge switch.
     
    JustForSport likes this.
  6. rojo412

    rojo412 Sit down, Danny... Supporting Member

    Feb 26, 2000
    Cleveland, OH.
    I like doing them and having fun wiring it all up. And even if the change isn't huge, it's fun to add possibilities...
    But yeah, when you wire it all up and something doesn't work, it sucks to try and troubleshoot or replace deeply wired-in parts.

    My favorite 3 pickup bass wiring is the Stu Hamm Urge basses. Brilliantly simple, despite seeming complex. A pan, a 3-way switch, and a volume. Pan goes between 2 outer pickups, middle is on the switch alone. Switch allows the signal from the pan, mid pickup, or both. So many options, yet super simple.

    And yes, Strats need N+B switches. It's stupid not to have one!
     
  7. lz4005

    lz4005

    Oct 22, 2013
    Does a single pickup, wired straight to the jack with no pots or caps count as crazy?
     
  8. BlueTalon

    BlueTalon Happy Cynic

    Mar 20, 2011
    Spokane, Washington
    Endorsing Artist: Turnstyle Switch
    I wouldn't say so. I used to have a Ric with two Carvin pickups wired straight out. I also used to have a guitar with one pickup and a volume control.

    Of course... might I count as crazy? Depends on who you ask.
     
  9. Everything should be done on a PWB. All the controls should wire directly to the PWB with no jumpers. No components floating in the compartment. Wiring should be ONLY long enough to safely remove the cover (with the PWB attached) far enough to unplug the wiring.

    Full access to all the pickup combinations should be granted. Instead of a complex 7-way switch, why not just use three mini-toggles?

    Does anybody know where I can get a blend switch? I'm looking for a strat-style blending lever for an old Ibanez EX365 (bridge humbucker, neck single coil) to replace the busted three-way switch.
     
  10. Wires should be short, but pickup leads should never, ever be cut short.

    What is a blend switch?
     
  11. jetgraphics

    jetgraphics

    Dec 12, 2007
    Jawjuh
    Sometimes I wish I could have a bass with the following settings:
    [] Mudbucker thump
    [] P bass (humbucking single coil)
    [] J bass (scooped tone, both pickups on)
    [] Airy acoustic bass (wide freq. range, and dynamic range)
     
  12. The first 3 are possible, picture a T-40 with a P pickup. (I am actually building one right now lol: JazzzzRay Mod | TalkBass.com )
     
  13. jetgraphics

    jetgraphics

    Dec 12, 2007
    Jawjuh
    Interesting idea...
    I have a Carvin LB50 with two dual / single coil pups. However, the neck pickup is in the Fender "Sweet" spot instead of butting the neck. I may try the "Red Rhodes" tone modification (T-40).
     
  14. iiipopes

    iiipopes Supporting Member

    May 4, 2009
    The more I play, the more I come back to traditional V-V-T wiring. Before onboard active electronics, I understood needing to get variable tones out of basses with chokes (Gibson), diodes (Jack Buce), series/parallel (early G&L) dual channel (Rickenbacker) and others.

    Now, with onboard and digital electronics, I especially like the simplicity of onboard V-V-T. About the craziest thing I do now is to put an EMG EXB on board, because it is a variable scoop control, which gives 99% of what I need on stage to go from vintage-to-modern or straight-to-slap. Second to that is if I have a bass which has a particularly noticeable impedance drop with both pickup full on, I will put a .01 capacitor between the hot lead of the bridge pickup and its volume control to eliminate the drop when both are full on, and be able to dial in the low end as desired when soloing bridge pickup.
     
  15. I think the old alembic Q filter was a pretty wild idea. Wickersham knew that sweeping a resonant peak in the treble and mids of an underwound and buffered pickup would kinda mimic the response of, well, all pickups... Sort of. Trouble was, it was widely misunderstood. "Why does my bass have a wah-wah pedal built in?"... ;)

    I've been into onboard electronics for a long time, playing and teaching bass for much of that time too. And I'm afraid I agree with line6, iipopes. Very few of the gimicks have stood up to the final test of just playing good clear basslines in a band or on a session. I've had just about every series-parallel switching and every onboard active filter you could think of. A few years ago I fitted a series-parallel blend pot in my MM. I though it would be great to have all that's between these two sounds. It took some fiddling, but it worked great! But on a few gigs, I found myself using it wound all the way to parallel or all the way to series!...
     
  16. Do you have a schematic? That would be awesome.
     
  17. khutch

    khutch Praise Harp

    Aug 20, 2011
    suburban Chicago
    I voted yes. It is true that poorly done DIY wiring can be unreliable and it is true that complex schemes often sound better in TB discussions than they do on stage. You don't have to do a poor job however and every once in a while you find one complex scheme out of a hundred, or thousand, that does something useful for you. I recently did the WalterW blend/switch mod on the blend pot in my Reggie Hamilton P/J and even though my ears fail to detect a significant difference, other ears claim they can. It is simple enough to do. Some time ago I replaced the mid band active mode pot in the same bass with a two pole, eleven position switch. Originally one pole had a set of resistors on it to mimic the mid band pot and the other was an 11 position "ToneStyler" tone control. The former was as good as the pot it replaced but the latter was overkill. So I modified the second pole so that it now mimics a five position traditional tone control turned one way from center and a five position ToneStyler when turned the other way from center. Now I am using it every time I play the bass in passive mode. It's a bit crazy (since the OP did not define "crazy" we each get to define it our own way) but useful. Probably the first mod I have done to a bass that made it more usably versatile than it already was. I don't do many physical mods to my basses, I sometimes have done 20 mods in a day on a circuit simulator however. Saves a lot of soldering and parts purchases!
     
  18. ChristoMephisto

    ChristoMephisto

    Sep 4, 2011
    I voted yes. I've done quite a few crazy mods to my guitars and basses.
    Really bad when you read through Guitarnuts2.proboards.com forum and start getting ideas to rewire something. Almost like having GAS.
     
  19. fjadams

    fjadams

    Jun 7, 2011
    Danbury, CT
    Generally I prefer V/B/StellarTone.
    Have a couple that are fancy complicated, but I end up just finding a selection or two I like and keep it there.

    Do have a fancy one I need for a bass I'm doing now but can't figure out how to do it and haven't been able to get anybody with greater knowledge to tell me how. I've been told it's doable and easy, but not how.
     
  20. sprag

    sprag

    Sep 15, 2011
    Melb Australia
    This but I'm in the middle of organising 2 x 4way and 1 x two way toggle switches for my 5501... Just so I know what I like. Then I'll get rid of anything unnecessary.
     

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