Crazy idea I just had... multi-band EQ?

Discussion in 'Effects [BG]' started by stringtheorist, Jul 23, 2005.

  1. stringtheorist


    Jul 14, 2005
    OK, so being a producer I commonly use multi-band compression on complete tracks to help pull together individual sounds into something that sounds like a single unit. Multi-band compression can add 'punch' and 'warmth' while not affecting dynamics of the mix as a whole.

    So here's my idea. What if someone desinged a processor for multi-band eq-ing. In other words, lets say one 15 band eq for each of three frequency ranges. This processor would detect the fundamental note, ignore the overtones and harmonics, and apply whatever eq settings were appropriate for the frequency range of the fundamental.

    Something like this could allow you to apply different eq settings to different frequency ranges on your neck, so for example, a low pass (high shelving) on lower frequencies for warm, dark sounds while playing backing rhythms, but at the same time allow bright sounds through when playing on the D & G strings.

  2. Trevorus


    Oct 18, 2002
    Urbana, IL
    Separate pickups for each set of strings would make this very easy. All it would take is two amplifiers to do it, though some people just use a crossover to run the highs from their bass into a guitar amp to acheive pretty much the same effect.
  3. what you're describing just sounds like a very high Q EQ. Imagine a regular grahpic equaliser but with 50 sliders instead of say 20.

    ok, for one, that's not a trivial excercise, otherwise the perfect octave pedal would not be a pipe dream. :crying:

    Another, once you've "ignored the overtones and harmonics" (which incidentally are the same thing) there's no longer any other frequency information to process. So, singling out the "bass" frequencys and then boosting 10khz isn't gonna do anything because there's no audio at 10khz to boost.

    It's like trying to make orange juice when all you've got is apples.

    Or am I missing what you're trying to describe?