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Cuarteto de Contrabajos de Madrid

Discussion in 'Recordings [DB]' started by olivier, Apr 6, 2006.


  1. olivier

    olivier

    Dec 17, 1999
    Paris, France
  2. Bruce Lindfield

    Bruce Lindfield Unprofessional TalkBass Contributor Gold Supporting Member In Memoriam

    Anything like these :

    [​IMG]

    ;)
     
  3. Anon2962

    Anon2962

    Aug 4, 2004
    Why do these bass ensembles exist? Ok ok, i know there's the novelty factor, but come on!

    On a less bitter note: Some of that stuff is good, but alot of the higher register stuff is quite out of tune...

    The Bass Gang sound much more in tune.

    EDIT: Wait a minute, that Brumby sounds good! Although again the playing isn't amazing. Must be so very hard to make this stuff sound good I spose. the sound of the higher voice sucks. IMO. :)
     
  4. Bruce Lindfield

    Bruce Lindfield Unprofessional TalkBass Contributor Gold Supporting Member In Memoriam

    Isn't there a sense in which "high register" and "out of tune" becomes a subjective area on Double Bass...? ;)
     
  5. olivier

    olivier

    Dec 17, 1999
    Paris, France
    Man, bass ensembles are fun !!! It's true for students and also for teachers / orchestra solists like those four. IMHO they have a right to breathe and post they stuff as they visit the repertory.
     
  6. Anon2962

    Anon2962

    Aug 4, 2004
    bruce linfield: Isn't there a sense in which "high register" and "out of tune" becomes a subjective area on Double Bass...?


    In most cases, especially mine at the moment, definately. But it is of course very possible to play in tune in the higher registers. Meyer, McTier, and Martin are three that spring to mind immediately. And Entcho Radoukenov - there's loads of guys who play REALLY in tune.

    I went to a masterclass with McTier. He explained that when he reads a new piece written for bass and piano, he reads the score, and works out what note he's playing in relation to the piano. He then marks in the part all the major thirds with a down-arrow, indicating to play slightly flatter than normal, and all the minor thirds with an up arrow etc etc. The bass is just a big violin, so there's no real reason for bassist NOT to play in tune just coz its not in lower registers.
     
  7. olivier

    olivier

    Dec 17, 1999
    Paris, France
    Kind of. If you check out their fotos on the site you'll see they opted for a cool t-shirt instead of the funny hat & hunter outfit...

    (re: sping2006 issue of the dbist: who else sleeps with dbasses ?)
     
  8. Anon2962

    Anon2962

    Aug 4, 2004
    Don't get me wrong, I also think that it's lots of fun to play in bass ensembles, I just never really understood the merits of a bass ensemble other than the fun factor. It usually sounds naff, and is somehow embarrassing i think. Like when a bunch of violin players come to hear a bass ensemble concert, and there's 4 guys playing some arrangement of something popular e.g. pink panther, carmen - it doesn't really compare to Shotakovich string quartets, does it?! :rolleyes:

    I think in general watching a bass ensemble play (excluding real pros like we heard here, and the bass gang) it's like watching stock car racing. You don't want anyone to get hurt, but there's always the feeling that a spectacular crash could happen at any time!;)
     
  9. olivier

    olivier

    Dec 17, 1999
    Paris, France
    Monster car shows!!! Serious fun!!!
     
  10. Bruce Lindfield

    Bruce Lindfield Unprofessional TalkBass Contributor Gold Supporting Member In Memoriam

    Yes - this is (jokingly) what I was getting at - so fine if you are playing with a piano, you can judge how sharp or flat to play this type of interval - but if it is all basses - then doesn't it just become a matter of opinion or taste!!?? ;)
     
  11. Anon2962

    Anon2962

    Aug 4, 2004
    Well not really - you stil have to tune the notes to the root of the chord. It would take an awfull lot of effort to do this though, it's such a mathematical method (FYI Mctier graduated with a maths degree. he doesn't have a music degree...and claims to only have had 3 bass lessons ever, the rest he figured out for himself! :eyebrow: He did concede that "they were good lessons").

    but it definately does help tuning, knowing what note you're playing and which way you should adjust it. especially for longer chords when it's more clearly heard.
     

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