1. Please read before selling or posting: TalkBass DB Classifieds Rules and FAQ
  2. Please take 30 seconds to register your free account to remove most ads, post topics, make friends, earn reward points at our store, and more!  

For Sale Czech/German bass

Discussion in 'For Sale: Double Basses' started by andy1357, Jan 12, 2020.


  1. andy1357

    andy1357

    Mar 31, 2015
    Ypsilanti, MI
    none.
    Price:
    $7500
    Strings:
    4
    Location:
    Michigan
    Nice, solid European shop bass. 42 in. string.

    Has been a good bass used on many jazz gigs.

    Likely around 70 years old.
     

    Attached Files:

    rknea likes this.
  2. LouisF

    LouisF Supporting Member

    Apr 21, 2003
    Los Angeles, CA
    Andy,

    If I'm reading the label correctly (and it's the original label) then I think your bass is French:

    Jérôme Thibouville-Lamy & Cie, abbreviated as "J.T.L.", was a French musical instrument making company, formed in the mid 19th century from the merger of pre-existing makers. It was based in Mirecourt, France, and was active producing large numbers of woodwind, brass and stringed instruments until the mid 20th century.
     
    Winoman and Phil Rowan like this.
  3. Fake label. German bass, maybe 1950s. Ish.
     
  4. LouisF

    LouisF Supporting Member

    Apr 21, 2003
    Los Angeles, CA
    Good eye, maestro!
     
  5. andy1357

    andy1357

    Mar 31, 2015
    Ypsilanti, MI
    none.
    Right. It was suggested it might have been an import to France that may have been varnished at JTL. Likely? Maybe, maybe not.
     
  6. LouisF

    LouisF Supporting Member

    Apr 21, 2003
    Los Angeles, CA
    Still, looks like a good instrument. Good luck.
    Louis
     
  7. andy1357

    andy1357

    Mar 31, 2015
    Ypsilanti, MI
    none.
    Board recently planed to remove old-style bevel.
     
  8. Bruno Maia

    Bruno Maia

    Apr 26, 2016
    After WWII the Jewish community of luthiers who reestablished in East Germany built around 5 million string instruments in their factories. Those were poor times. The more units made the more starving mouths to feed.

    It is estimated that among the "modern trade" violins, violas, cellos and double basses about half were violins. I own 2 modern trade German violins I purchased for £150 each. They are exxelent. Great projection, figured maple sides and back, awesome. Only I am a bass player. I also own a German cello worth £1250 and a German double bass, all post-war instruments from that period and location.

    There are likely about 1 million basses like that out there. These instruments were the first ones made in series in the world.
    Kay laminated basses were made in the first factories, as well. Maybe even Leo Fender got inspired by production lines from post-war Europe.


    That is when ply wood instruments were invented. Carving took too long, and olny "premium" models were fully carved. Most basses were hybrid or fully laminated.

    Like mentioned, JLT was a factory in Mirecourt, France, the same situation as those from Marknenkeurchen, Germany, struggling professionals making up after the war. I have seen French factory bass that looks German somewhere for sale. Maybe some basses sold as French were made in Germany? Maybe JTL commisioned from Germany to cope with their demand?

    Some people own ply wood German instruments and never knew about it. Even the laminated ones sound good. They lack a bit projection, though. When plugged they easily get away.

    A 1950's good sound laminated with original neck ranges between £2.5 and 3k. They are sturdy, and mostly seen at pub jazz gigs.

    I'd rather own a laminated modern trade German than a brand new fully carved Jay Haide or Shen, or some other paddle made overseas.
     
  9. andy1357

    andy1357

    Mar 31, 2015
    Ypsilanti, MI
    none.
    Thanks for the insight. Just to be clear, this is a carved bass.
     
  10. Bruno Maia

    Bruno Maia

    Apr 26, 2016
    From the pictures shown it is difficult to identify it is carved.
    The picture from the inside of the bottom shows the wood well. Is it the same grain pattern as from the outside? Would you have a picture in close up of the bottom, on the same point of the one showing the label?
    Regarding the top, would you be able to share a picture of the corner? Anywhere showing the grain goes until the end where the top wood joins the ribs?
    That makes it easier for buyers to understand it is carved.
     
  11. andy1357

    andy1357

    Mar 31, 2015
    Ypsilanti, MI
    none.
    Pandemic special: $7000
     
  12. Bruce Calin

    Bruce Calin

    Oct 15, 2002
    It looks very similar to a bass I have owned since the '60's and I know is from at least the '30's and definitely German and fully carved. The backs look absolutely identical. The color is also similar but yours is so clean-looking that it almost looks refinished. Mine is labeled " Adolf Deichsel" in Berlin- label all in German. From what I understand Deichsel was a distributor and put their label in hand-built factory instruments. It would be great if someone has more info. Mine has hat pegs but otherwise is very similar in appearance. It has been an excellent bass, very sturdy and reliable with good sound in every situation I have used it. Someone should grab this bass.
     
    andy1357 likes this.
  13. andy1357

    andy1357

    Mar 31, 2015
    Ypsilanti, MI
    none.
    I have failed to mention that the bridge is stamped Yumi Fujimore. Not sure of the spelling as the last few letters are obscured. Perhaps it's a luthier who performed some measure of restoration on the instrument at some point.
     

    Attached Files:

  14. oren

    oren

    Aug 7, 2007
    Salem, OR
    Not to derail this thread, but reading what @Bruno Maia said above raised a question for me. I have a laminated Juzek with a label that says Prague. I was told at one point that Juzek moved shop to East Germany after the war, so my bass was likely made pre (or during) war. Likely, or not?
     
  15. Unlikely. Very.

    Can you imagine the Third Reich allowing perfectly good wood to be diverted to double bass production, not to mention skilled labor?

    Not to mention that plywood basses weren’t even invented until after the Nazis invaded Bohemia.

    Your bass probably came out of Benedikt Lang’s shop. Call Bobby Juzek at Metropolitan Music and ask for the family history, then apply common sense to place your instrument in context.
     

Share This Page

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.