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DB forum WIKI-knowlegeable people, please check in

Discussion in 'Miscellaneous [DB]' started by Chris Fitzgerald, Mar 23, 2013.


  1. Chris Fitzgerald

    Chris Fitzgerald Student of Life Staff Member Administrator

    Oct 19, 2000
    Louisville, KY
    I think all of the WIKIs popping up here in the DB forums are great, and it's beyond high time that something come up to replace all of the old FAQ/links threads I created long ago (most of those were put together initially when i was still on a dialup connection!). I know very little about WIKI construction, however, and would like to learn more about it: the how-to part, the pro and con part, the nuts and bolts, etc.

    Also, if anyone would like to volunteer to start one in a forum that could seem to use one, please do so, and let the rest of the membership here know so people who know how to can contribute. Once i get my WIKI sea legs under me and the schedule eases up a bit, I'll start chiming in a bit. This seems to be a great way to update our aging structure here in the DB forums, and I'd like to learn how and help get the ball rolling. Teach me if you can! :)
     
  2. Chris Fitzgerald

    Chris Fitzgerald Student of Life Staff Member Administrator

    Oct 19, 2000
    Louisville, KY
    Bump. :)
     
  3. Tom Lane

    Tom Lane Gold Supporting Member Supporting Member

    I'm willing to help. I work in IT/KM and know about wiki's in general. Other than Ed's *REALLY learning a tune* thread, I can't think of any others that deserve to be so immortalized. Do you have any thoughts about which threads we should start with?
     
  4. Chris Fitzgerald

    Chris Fitzgerald Student of Life Staff Member Administrator

    Oct 19, 2000
    Louisville, KY
    Sorry to be so late on this - the semester has just finished and life is slowing down a bit. It's not so much about specific threads (although Ed's thread is a really good one), but more about getting the ball rolling on certain topics. After the excellent wiki entry Beginner's Guide to Buying a Double Bass, I started thinking about how it was a great resource for collaborative knowledge, and how different forums could benefit from an entry on their topics. Amps, Mics, and Pickups comes immediately to mind, for instance.

    Paul (site admin) has hinted that the new forum software will make wiki-ing much simpler, but I still feel behind the 8 ball on the whole subject and feel that I need to start learning. Is there a wiki on wiki-ing? :D
     
  5. Chris Fitzgerald

    Chris Fitzgerald Student of Life Staff Member Administrator

    Oct 19, 2000
    Louisville, KY
    Bump now that we are on the new software. Still wondering about the status of the wiki feature and hoping to learn more about how to create some useful entries to replace the old "links" threads. It's time to replace Sticky with Wiki.
     
  6. Tom Lane

    Tom Lane Gold Supporting Member Supporting Member

    Can you be more specific about what help you're looking for?
     
  7. Chris Fitzgerald

    Chris Fitzgerald Student of Life Staff Member Administrator

    Oct 19, 2000
    Louisville, KY
    Just the basics: how it works, how to start a topic, how to edit it, and what's the meaning of life? :D
     
    Tom Lane likes this.
  8. Tom Lane

    Tom Lane Gold Supporting Member Supporting Member

    Oh, that!
     
    Chris Fitzgerald likes this.
  9. Steven Ayres

    Steven Ayres Supporting Member

    Mar 11, 2007
    Northern Arizona
    I've been considering setting up a wiki page on the many Kay bass models, differences among them, spotting guide, etc. I'm new at this. Does this seem like a good idea?
     
    csrund and james condino like this.
  10. Chris Fitzgerald

    Chris Fitzgerald Student of Life Staff Member Administrator

    Oct 19, 2000
    Louisville, KY
    Yes! This is exactly the kind of thing I was thinking about. There are lots of knowledgable people out there, and once somebody defines a topic, others will likely want to add what they know. I think the "Beginner's Guide" wiki linked above is absolutely brilliant and incredibly useful. I'm an old dog and learning new tricks will take me time, but I want to encourage others to do things like this and hopefully I can watch and pick their (your) brains.
     
  11. hdiddy

    hdiddy Official Forum Flunkee Supporting Member

    Mar 16, 2004
    Richmond, CA
    A wiki is pretty simple. Basically there are certain tags that allow for HTML style formatting ("Markup" is the M in HTML). This forum uses some similar concepts, like how you apply quotes in replies and what not. It's just that you type these things out by hand rather than use a gui editor, altho some WIKI's also have this type of editing feature.

    The biggest thing about wikis (as is with HTML pages) is the ability to create links to other pages for cross referencing. Pages can be created on the fly with links to pages not yet created.

    TBH, the easiest thing here is RTFM. I usually resort to looking for the online help for that particular Wiki software to see how the tags are used, and then look at an existing page as to see how the tags are applied. It's all quite simple and something you should already be familiar with. It won't take long for you to figure it out.

    Other things to know is that with every change made to page, the delta (differences, are archived so you can always go back and fetch an older version. Sometimes this is used to fix errant entries someone else made or recover older versions.

    Pro tips:
    * Pay attention to how you name all the pages for every new wiki page. Keeping a common pattern/structure will make it easier to manage in the long run. Don't name things haphazardly and keep this well enforced.
    * Content is king, but managing dead links can be a hassle
    * Allow multiple editors - almost where the more the merrier. It's easier to keep pages up to date this way
    * Similarly, wiki is all about info sharing. Divide and conquer.
    * Try to be succinct with each page and don't be afraid to break a page up into separate pages if it starts to cover too many topics
    * Make a lot of use with Anchors. You can link directly to particular sections of another page so the reader doesn't have to search for where they continuing their reading. This is a key point.
    * Make use of charts, graphs, bullet points, tables, etc. whenever possible to keep things clean.
    * Links can be embedded within elements (i.e. links to anchors placed within a table)
    * Get ready to manage images and getting used to embedding them into a page. Formatting is important as to where the picture lines up.
    * Preview is your friend, use it!

    More as I can think of it.
     
  12. Chris Fitzgerald

    Chris Fitzgerald Student of Life Staff Member Administrator

    Oct 19, 2000
    Louisville, KY
    Huy - half of what you wrote I don't understand, but I will book mark it and return to it later. What i need is something like a "Wiki for dummies" reference. I used to love those "For Dummies" books, and still have a few very useful ones. Maybe I should buy this one: Wikis For Dummies: Dan Woods, Peter Thoeny: 9780470043998: Amazon.com: Books Will leave the link here so i can revisit when I have time to delve deeper.
     
  13. hdiddy

    hdiddy Official Forum Flunkee Supporting Member

    Mar 16, 2004
    Richmond, CA
    I wouldn't bother. I'm telling you, it's not hard at all.

    YouTube can be helpful in this regard.



    I'll be happy to help and answer any questions you might have. I've managed wikis for years for work purposes. Hint, I'm between jobs so I have time so take advantage of it.

    I'll try and think of a good topic, or You can suggest one, and I can get everyone started on the right foot.
     
    Chris Fitzgerald likes this.
  14. hdiddy

    hdiddy Official Forum Flunkee Supporting Member

    Mar 16, 2004
    Richmond, CA
    I'll take on the "really learn at tune" thread and show how it's done. I won't get to it for a few days tho.
     
  15. Chris Fitzgerald

    Chris Fitzgerald Student of Life Staff Member Administrator

    Oct 19, 2000
    Louisville, KY

    Thanks, that's very helpful. Probably an obvious question, but what keeps a trollish person from destroying the work of the folks who create a useful wiki entry? I always wondered about this.
     
  16. hdiddy

    hdiddy Official Forum Flunkee Supporting Member

    Mar 16, 2004
    Richmond, CA
    It's not that obvious actually but a very important point to understand.

    It's all done through revision control. Every time you save a page, that particular version is archived as part of the page's history. So if someone trashes a page, you can go back to earlier versions and retrieve a good version. Same goes if something was entered incorrectly as an honest mistake.

    Example: Here's the revision history for "Underwater Basket Weaving" on Wikipedia.
    Underwater basket weaving: Revision history - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    You can go to an older version by clicking on the dates. It shows who made the edits and any comment they had for it. "cur" and "prev" are options to show the delta (differences) between the current or the previous version of that page. This is where using a preview feature (usually available when you're in edit mode) where you can review your changes before you save them. It's just nice to have a clean page history where there's not a bunch of edits due to typos being fixed.
     
    Chris Fitzgerald likes this.
  17. hdiddy

    hdiddy Official Forum Flunkee Supporting Member

    Mar 16, 2004
    Richmond, CA
    One more point: deleting pages is dangerous. Generally, when a page is deleted, the page history also gets deleted. In practice it's better to orphan pages (meaning there's no link to get to it directly) until you're ready to actually delete it permanently.
     
  18. hdiddy

    hdiddy Official Forum Flunkee Supporting Member

    Mar 16, 2004
    Richmond, CA
    Page created and I've compiled Ed's comments from the thread here: Jazz: Really Learning a Tune | TalkBass.com

    Unfortunately, this forum software is not a true wiki and is missing many parts of what a good wiki can do. It uses BB code tags and not true wiki markup tags. I already noticed some bugs with the ordered list being used when the page is rendered.

    IMO, the forum software for Wiki is extemely basic. There are mark ups available in other wiki software along with other tools that make things very easy. BBCode sucks for this purpose.
     
    Last edited: Mar 22, 2016
    Chris Fitzgerald likes this.
  19. hdiddy

    hdiddy Official Forum Flunkee Supporting Member

    Mar 16, 2004
    Richmond, CA
    In typical wiki use, headings play a big role. You don't have to tag things like you do with BB code.
    * "h1." at the start of a line will give you level 1 heading (big big bold letters). It goes from h1 through h9 I think.
    * Bullet points are automatically interpreted by asterisks. # gives you ordered lists.
    * Italics are done using other tags (- or + symbols, * for bold).
    * Indentation is done by spaces at the beginning of a line.

    There are so many little things available with wiki markup language. BBCode just doesn't cut it. IMO, this stuff is not ready for prime-time.
     
  20. Chris Fitzgerald

    Chris Fitzgerald Student of Life Staff Member Administrator

    Oct 19, 2000
    Louisville, KY
    I think I understand what you're doing and also your complaint about the native system on Xenforo (although a little less of the latter than the former). So you don't think what we have can be very useful until it is upgraded or farmed off-site and linked?
     

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