DC resistance and tone of a pickup

Discussion in 'Pickups & Electronics [BG]' started by subdude67, May 11, 2018.

  1. subdude67

    subdude67

    Jan 18, 2010
    Kenya
    If 2 different Jazz Bass PU sets have greatly different resistance, (6.2 & 6.8k vs. 3.0 & 3.4k) can any prediction be made on the sound of these 2 sets?
     
    Last edited: May 11, 2018
  2. Snaxster

    Snaxster

    Nov 29, 2008
    Hello. If for a given make/model and all other factors are constant, maybe. Otherwise no.

    Similarly, no prediction can be made about two sets that are not the same make/model and have identical DCR measurements.

    Thus it depends on what "different" means in "different Jazz Bass PU sets" in your question.
     
  3. Yes. The 3K pickups will almost certainly have a resonant peak that is much higher in frequency than the 6k ones. To wind a jazz single coil to 3K means either less windings or thicker magnet wire. So less inductance, less impedence etc.

    But pretty much nothing else can really be predicted. And having said that, a pickup with a big resonant peak at say, 4khz will often be perceived as brighter in tone than one with the same sized peak at say, 12khz. That's because the transients from your bass strings are much more prominent in the mid and low treble than in the upper treble. Plus, even with a tweeter, a bass cab generally won't be voiced with extended high treble response like a studio monitor or hifi speakers are.

    Really, pickup winders should publish the inductance of their products. That would be a better thing to compare (but also not definitive of course).
     
  4. subdude67

    subdude67

    Jan 18, 2010
    Kenya
    Thanks guys. Here are the details:
    A local bassist asked me if I could fix his no name jazz bass. After checking it I found that the entire electronics are shot. I want to buy a pair of replacements from china and while there are hundreds to chose from they all indicate dimensions and resistance but no other data. Some go as low as 3k (those have a single, larger magnet per string instead of the usual 2 small ones) others as high as 12k. Should I go middle of the road and order some with about 6k?
     
  5. Killed_by_Death

    Killed_by_Death Snaggletooth Inactive

    Average between those values would be 9K Ohms.
    Ask the owner if they want it hot & dark or bright with lower output.
     
  6. subdude67

    subdude67

    Jan 18, 2010
    Kenya
    So, in the most general terms

    high resistance equals higher output and less treble

    low resistance equlals lower output and less bass?
     
    Dennis Davis likes this.
  7. sikamikanico

    sikamikanico

    Mar 17, 2004
    Yes, if all else is equal, but only until the last part - low resistance does not equal less bass, though I suppose it may be perceived that way.
     
    Dennis Davis likes this.
  8. Killed_by_Death

    Killed_by_Death Snaggletooth Inactive

    As RobbieK pointed out, a lower resistance means a high resonant peak. That doesn't necessarily mean less bass, it just means that the pronounced part of the timbre will be a higher frequency than a pickup with high resistance.

    The Big Singles in my Ibanez Premium are 8 - 8.5K Ohms, and they've got good highs & mids. If you want more output & a lower resonant frequency get the 12K Ohm pickups.

    resonant frequency just means the pickups will have their lowest impedance at that point & produce the most output at that frequency
     
    Dennis Davis and subdude67 like this.
  9. subdude67

    subdude67

    Jan 18, 2010
    Kenya
    Thanks for your input, I will order a set with higher resistance.
     
    Killed_by_Death likes this.