Dead spot on my Stingray

Discussion in 'Basses [BG]' started by Festus, Feb 5, 2002.

  1. Festus


    Dec 12, 2001
    London, England.
    I have just noticed I have a dead spot on the neck of my Stinger.
    The 6th and 7th frets on the G string are dead to the world. Those notes die so quickly it's even noticeable when I strum quick chords. It doesn't matter how many times I change the G string either. The nut is perfectly fine, the bridge is fine, my battery is fine.
    Has anybody got any suggestions on how to cure/prevent this problem?
    I love my Stingray and I don't want to have to get a new one unless I really have to.

    Your good advice and opinions are needed.

    Thank you for reading.

    Uncle Festus
  2. Could you possibly have a fret problem there? I'd have someone take a look at that. A good tech should be able to tell if the frets are ok.
  3. perhaps the neck got warped, and needs to be adjusted... something to think about
  4. Chasarms

    Chasarms Casual Observer

    May 24, 2001
    Bettendorf, IA USA
    It is very possible that it is a setup issue. It is also possible that it is an actual dead spot. That is the properties of the wood are such that they are absorbing the energy of the string in that frequency range.

    Because of the location of it as you described, I would think it is certainly possible that it is a real dead spot. I have seen far too many Fender's with it in the 4-5 fret range of the G. You are certainly in that ball park.

    If it is indeed a dead spot, there isn't much you can do to fix it. My first suggestion would be to have decent tech look at it.

  5. Sounds like the all too common dead spot found on many basses around the 5th to 7th frets on the G. Usually happens to Fenders and other similar bolt on neck basses but it does happen to neck throughs and set necks as well from time to time. I've seen a device in catalogs that clamps onto the headstock and helps to lessen the deadness. Never tried one though. You might be able to EQ the dead spot out some if you can isolate and boost that frequency.