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dead spot reason enough for a refund/exchange?

Discussion in 'Basses [BG]' started by remo, Jan 11, 2006.


  1. remo

    remo

    Jan 15, 2005
    just wondering if a very noticible dead spot on a brand new and otherwise perfect bass would be reason enough to accept for a refund or exchange? anyone been down this road?
     
  2. what kind of bass is it? has it been set-up properly?
     
  3. steve21

    steve21 Banned

    I'd say maybe not a refund, but definately make them set it up for free/discount
     
  4. remo

    remo

    Jan 15, 2005
    bass has been setup several times and brand new strings.. dead spot remains.. this has nothing to do with the setup I am %100 certain.
     
  5. full_bleed

    full_bleed

    May 27, 2005
    Arizona
    was it an instrument that you had a chance to try out before putting down the cash for it? If you did try it out or had the oppertunity to try out that exact bass then I would say it's not the stores fault and you'll just have to deal with it. On the other hand if you tried out a bass that was on the floor then they brought an unmolested one out from their storage in a box then I would say it would be subject for an exchange. I don't personally feel it would warrant a refund unless you exchanged the bass and the 2nd one also had a very noticable dead spot(s).
     
  6. Its not your SR5 right?
     
  7. Free set up.

    If that doesn't fix it, refund.
     
  8. pickles

    pickles Supporting Member

    Mar 23, 2000
    Ventura, CA
    I recently returned a very expensive bass due mostly to dead spots. The shop was very cool about it, and in that case I didn't at all mind paying a "restock" fee. If you like the bass otherwise, a groove tubes fat head could help, but dead spots really bum me out and I couldn't deal.
     
  9. ajb

    ajb

    Mar 20, 2005
    A dead spot is sufficient reason for a refund, even if you had a chance to play it in the store. Sometimes "defects" don't manifest themselves until you get to try the instrument in a real world situation. Say for example you didn't realize until rehearsal just how bad the dead spot was, and it prevented you from playing a particular note common to many rock songs, i.e., high "D" on the g string. The bass isn't capable of performing the basic function for which you purchased it, right? And wasn't it implied that the bass could perform this function when you purchased it, even if not expressly so stated by the retailer? That's called an implied waranty of merchantability, and the dead spot, if bad enough, could constitute a breach of that warranty.

    So take the bass back if you're not happy with it. Toss in terms like "implied warranty" and trust me, they'll take it back. I'm an attorney; I should know. Always be aggressive to protect your rights as a consumer!
     
  10. ajb

    ajb

    Mar 20, 2005
    And don't pay any silly "restock" fee! They sold you a non-conforming product, period.
     
  11. fatsobasso

    fatsobasso

    Dec 24, 2005
    Ormond florida
    i love that,lawyers are great when they truly work for the rights of the consumer.
     
  12. Figjam

    Figjam

    Aug 5, 2003
    Boston, MA
    What kind of bass? :(
     
  13. RunngDog

    RunngDog

    Jan 22, 2003
    Chicago, IL
    Depends a bit on make and model -- I'd call a Fender jazz without a dead spot a non-conforming product.
     
  14. ajb

    ajb

    Mar 20, 2005
    I agree entirely that a Fender Jazz (or any other wood-necked instrument) without a dead spot would be unusual. Two points: (1) some dead spots are worse than others, but more importantly, 2) it puts the store in a very uncomfortable position to have to tell you that the instrument they sold is inherently flawed (even if it is). Also, the customer, especially if he's a beginning bassist, could rightfully claim ignorance of the dead spot issue.

    I don't mean to get too lawyerly in all of this -- my main point is just that the original poster should be as aggressive as possible in trying to get a full refund if he's not happy with what he bought. A lot of people think (wrongly) that they are at the store's mercy when they purchase an item, any item. That's just not true. Many states, including California where I practice, have laws in place specifically designed to protect the rights of consumers. It's a shame that many people just aren't aware of this and feel that they have choice but to keep (or re-sell at a loss) a store-bought item that they're not happy with.
     
  15. Figjam

    Figjam

    Aug 5, 2003
    Boston, MA
    If its your EBMM, call customer service and theyll take care of you. Assuming you bought it through them which you probably didnt, come to think of it.
     
  16. pickles

    pickles Supporting Member

    Mar 23, 2000
    Ventura, CA
    Also, make sure your neck bolts are nice and tight.
     
  17. remo

    remo

    Jan 15, 2005
    nope, its my mates brand new MIM fender Jazz.. I'm trying to convince him to get another one so I can use it in our band!!
     
  18. Figjam

    Figjam

    Aug 5, 2003
    Boston, MA
    Okay, good news. As long as it isnt an EBMM, because deadspots are rare on em :)
     
  19. Rock City

    Rock City

    Apr 8, 2001
    Boston,Ma
    Being a retailer and bassist, I say talk to your dealer. Lawyers are for lawsuits, but a good dealer is your liason to the manufacturer. Give your dealer the chance to make good. He'll get you another bass from the same manufacturer and you'll be happy. You obviously wanted this type of bass anyway.....right?
    Don't go to your dealer with your guns blazing yelling "lawsuit". That does no-one any good, and sets a bad mood from the start.
    You have to remember that the dealer(in most cases) didn't build it, and most dealers don't play every note on the neck to check them. Hey, these guys are just trying to pay their mortgage and feed their kids! He most likely is completely oblivious to the problem. If he KNEW there was a problem and took advantage of you, then I'd look into the refund, and find an honest dealer.
    Corey
     
  20. ajb

    ajb

    Mar 20, 2005
    For the record, I never recommended that the original poster go into the store "with guns blazing" and threatening a lawsuit. The question by the original poster was: Is a dead spot sufficient reason for a refund or an exchange? My answer is yes. Being assertive with respect to your rights as a consumer is not the same as threatening a lawsuit, and if that is the impression I gave then I apologize. One of the earlier posters made a comment that the original poster wouldn't be entitled to a refund or an exchange if he tried the bass out in the store, and I was only trying to correct that common misperception.