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Dead Spots... AHHHH!!!

Discussion in 'Luthier's Corner' started by taviswardlaw, Jan 20, 2005.


  1. Okay, so i'm just about to build my first bass. And i was wondering how do I make sure I don't have dead spots on the fingerboard. I'm not sure if that's correct terminology, but it's what I've been told is the name for when you're moving up the fretboard and suddenly you get to one place and the volume and tone dies out, then you get past that place on the fretboard, and it's all back... I had this problem on one of my first basses and I REALLY want to avoid it.
    So is it just a matter of the quality of the neck/fingerboard wood, or is there another way to deal with it? :help:

    Thanks TB-ers :)
     
  2. paintandsk8

    paintandsk8 Pushin' my soul through the wire...

    May 12, 2003
    West Lafayette, IN
    Well I'm just a babe in the Luthier game, but I have heard that putting graphite bars in the neck can help in the avoidance of dead spots. I also think that making sure that you have a great bond between the fretboard and the neck is important.
     
  3. hmmm.. okay, thatnks for that...
    Where should I lok for graphite? LMII.com?
     
  4. paintandsk8

    paintandsk8 Pushin' my soul through the wire...

    May 12, 2003
    West Lafayette, IN
    I know stewmac has them.
     
  5. Forget the graphite.

    Consistent quality in the fretting job should eliminate any dead spots.
     
  6. paintandsk8

    paintandsk8 Pushin' my soul through the wire...

    May 12, 2003
    West Lafayette, IN
    The fret job causes deadspots? How do fretless basses get deadspots?
     
  7. Nowhere in the post does it say it's a fretless.

    If the board is flat, there shouldn't be any.
     
  8. Suburban

    Suburban

    Jan 15, 2001
    lower mid Sweden
    Dead spots occur, whne the resonanse of the instrument interferes with the vibrations of the string.
    What you need to do, is either make the neck so weak that the resonanse frequeses are all under the lowest bass note, or so stiff that they are all higher than some 8kHz.
    Also note, that at least the dead spots of Fender clones are due to torsional vibration.

    Good design, good construction is the key. And if that isn't enough (?) you add graphite stringers.
     
  9. paintandsk8

    paintandsk8 Pushin' my soul through the wire...

    May 12, 2003
    West Lafayette, IN
    thanks suburban, good explanation. When I asked about fretless basses having dead spots that was a general question, not necessarily related to the original post. I always thougt deadspots sounded like two out of phase cancelling each other, now it makes sense.