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Defretted neck, treatment for natural feeling

Discussion in 'Luthier's Corner' started by D.Don, Sep 22, 2008.


  1. I have just about defretted a neck and wood filler is drying over the night. After sanding it tomorrow I will stain it with black stain/dye. When stain has dried, what would be the best treatment? I do not want to epoxy or varnish it since I'd like the "natural" feeling (using flats). Is linseed or mineral oil the way to go?

    Thanks!

    D.Don
     
  2. XylemBassGuitar

    XylemBassGuitar Supporting Member Commercial User

    Aug 14, 2008
    Durango, CO
    Owner and Operator, Xylem Handmade Basses and Guitars
    If it's a maple fretboard, you'll probably want to use a hard finish of some kind.

    If it's something like ebony, rosewood, pau ferro, cocobolo, etc. you could use Danish oil for that natural look and feel.
     
  3. It's dark-redish probably a rosewood (it's not maple at least), Danish oil?

    D.Don
     
  4. I used a product on a purpleheart board that was called "Scandinavian Oil" it was a wipe-on polyurethane/danish oil mix...

    I applied 3 coats...it's quite hard but leaves a very natural feeling. I went on to use the remainder of the bottle on my wooden tool handles (axe, mattock, shovel, etc...)
     
  5. What about teak oil?

    D.Don
     
  6. XylemBassGuitar

    XylemBassGuitar Supporting Member Commercial User

    Aug 14, 2008
    Durango, CO
    Owner and Operator, Xylem Handmade Basses and Guitars
    You could definitely use Danish oil on that dark-reddish fretboard.

    I've never heard of teak oil, but you could probably also use tung oil.
     
  7. I'd love to test the danish oil, but it seems impossible to find in Paris!

    Found on eBay UK, shipping price 12 GPB, a joke!!

    D.Don
     
  8. XylemBassGuitar

    XylemBassGuitar Supporting Member Commercial User

    Aug 14, 2008
    Durango, CO
    Owner and Operator, Xylem Handmade Basses and Guitars
    Ouch...yeah I wouldn't pay that either.
     
  9. Finally found 250 ml for 5 GBP and 5 GBP shipping, went for that, next time I go to the UK I am thinking of getting some more there if this works out fine.

    Thanks for the heads up!

    D.Don
     
  10. Should I apply some kind of wax in the end too? Or is that just overkill after the danish oil?

    D.Don
     
  11. XylemBassGuitar

    XylemBassGuitar Supporting Member Commercial User

    Aug 14, 2008
    Durango, CO
    Owner and Operator, Xylem Handmade Basses and Guitars
    I just use Danish oil alone on my fretless necks, I haven't ever experimented with wax too.
     
  12. jimmy rocket

    jimmy rocket

    Jan 24, 2008
    Ayden, NC
    I used tung oil, and mine was on a maple fingerboard. A slow build-up of multiple coats gave me a nice smooth natural feeling finish that is surprisingly resilient


    2850884332_2e46122983_b.
     
  13. I'll have a go with the danish oil and then we'll see if there's a need for more after that then.

    Thanks!

    D.Don
     
  14. Looking good there!

    More pics?

    :)

    D.Don
     
  15. Any recommendations for how many coats of danish oil to rub in? I just wiped of the second one, and was thinking that "oh well a cpl of more could never hurt", so now I am letting the fretboard rest for 30 mins after the second coat was wiped off and then I'll have a go for a third at least.

    ;)

    Cheers!

    D.Don
     
  16. you're right a couple more could never hurt.

    3 is a good number...but why not put on 6-8?
     
  17. Probably will end up with that, will do two more layers tomorrow, and then let it rest for another day, and then the how-to suggests to rub the last 2-3 layers wet sanding in the danish oil with the finest grits (320, 400) I have no problems with it but I am just curios if this is the way to do it on a fingerboard too?

    Cheers!

    D.Don
     
  18. I'd suggest that you use 800-1200 grit for the last wet-sand...
    and by all means, change the sandpaper regularly and wipe down THOROUGHLY after each layer. Use very light, even pressure and attack the grain straight and then at two opposing slight angles (~20 degrees) back to straight.
     
  19. Hmm, how do you mean there with the angles?

    Cheers!

    D.Don
     
  20. like this:

    neck goes this way: |

    Sanding sequence is like this: | \ / |
     

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