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Di from amp head vs micing can vs sansamp (hint:want girth)

Discussion in 'Recording Gear and Equipment [BG]' started by Jfever, Apr 20, 2015.


  1. Jfever

    Jfever

    Feb 28, 2015
    thanks in advance
     
  2. Post a link to a song that has a similar tone to what you're going for.
     
  3. Jfever

    Jfever

    Feb 28, 2015
     
  4. Jfever

    Jfever

    Feb 28, 2015
    I meant to type "micing cab"
     
  5. mbelue

    mbelue

    Dec 11, 2010
    We could all use some "girth".
     
  6. silky smoove

    silky smoove Supporting Member

    May 19, 2004
    Seattle, WA
    All of those options can deliver girth in a recording situation. The big question for me would be what gear is available outside of the Sansamp option? A lot of folks will try to use sub-standard cabinets, the wrong microphones, a bad space, or some combination thereof and wind up bummed by the results.

    If you're new to the recording thing, and fall into any of the items listed above, I would take the dry signal and the wet signal from the Sansamp simultaneously on separate channels. Push the wet channel to get a little overdrive and compression and make sure the blend knob is at 100% since you'll be blending the wet and dry sides in post. After that, phase-align the two tracks in your DAW, then start with the dry channel, and blend in the wet channel to taste.
     
  7. Jfever

    Jfever

    Feb 28, 2015
    I'm not new to recording.
    The gear available outside sansamp solution is to buy a power head. And connect directly to daw. I don't have an amp now and would view this as a last resort.
    I am leaning towards eq since my previous attempts are not getting me the sound I want.
     
  8. silky smoove

    silky smoove Supporting Member

    May 19, 2004
    Seattle, WA
    Power head? Does that mean an amp head, or a power amp. Since you said you'd be connecting it directly I'm guessing you meant amp head. In that case, you're just getting a run of the mill DI with an EQ in front of it. At that point I'd just use the Sansamp into two channels as described above and call it good. Either that or just plug directly into your interface and do everything in post.
     
  9. Jfever

    Jfever

    Feb 28, 2015
    Ok thanks I think mentally having it configured to the sound I want while playing adds to my performance
     
  10. silky smoove

    silky smoove Supporting Member

    May 19, 2004
    Seattle, WA
    I agree. It definitely helps the vibe. Either on your interface, or in your DAW, you should be able to set the monitor level of each channel outside of the input gain. By doing that you can set proper levels going in, and set the playback mix to give you the tone you're after while recording.

    Sansamps have their pluses and minuses, but this configuration is my absolute favorite way to use them. They're really effective when you can blend the dry signal back in to minimize the built-in mid scoop.
     
  11. Jfever

    Jfever

    Feb 28, 2015
    I have the vt so there is no mid scoop. I also don't want round trip latency
     
  12. Jfever

    Jfever

    Feb 28, 2015
    Could I be totally off base by saying that this could have something to do with Passive vs Active basses? Would an active bass give me more Umph?
     
  13. silky smoove

    silky smoove Supporting Member

    May 19, 2004
    Seattle, WA
    The VT absolutely does have a mid scoop. Using a Sansamp of any variety isn't going to add any latency as it's an analog circuit.

    A passive bass will work just fine. Plenty of thump, girth, wham, slam, pow, boom, etc :p from passive basses.
     
  14. Jfever

    Jfever

    Feb 28, 2015
    Thanks the more I think about it the more I think I should go into an eq pedal then my bmax-t and use sansamp out to the daw and the di out of the bmax to another channel.
     
  15. silky smoove

    silky smoove Supporting Member

    May 19, 2004
    Seattle, WA
    You mentioned your Sansamp was a VT. Is this a VTDI, or just the regular VT?

    If it's just the regular, I get why you're using the BMax-T. If it's the VTDI, leave the BMax-T out of the equation.
     
  16. silky smoove

    silky smoove Supporting Member

    May 19, 2004
    Seattle, WA
    I would also leave the EQ out of the equation. You have much more powerful EQ tools in post than you do in a pedal.

    Additionally: How are you splitting the signal between the BBE and Sansamp units?
     
  17. Jfever

    Jfever

    Feb 28, 2015
    Ok
    1. I have the VTDI.
    2. I would like to use my BMAX-T because it is made especially for bass...
    3. Is even a Whirlwind pedal not powerful enough? (18V and 6 bands under 1khz)

    Are you saying I should sell the BMAX-T and focus on software EQ not pedals?


    Current setup is:
    Bass->SANSAMP->effected 1/4"->ManleyDualMonoPre in 1/4" input (-20db padding)->Apogee->DAW
    Bass->SANSAMP->unaffected 1/4"->BMAX-T->Apogee->DAW

    Suggested setup by my previous post:
    Bass->(EQ pedal if i had one)->BMAX-T->SANSAMP->Affected 1/4"-> Apogee->DAW
    Bass->(EQ pedal if i had one)->BMAX-T->SANSAMP->Unaffected XLR DI->Apogee Mic Pre->DAW
     
  18. Jfever

    Jfever

    Feb 28, 2015
    Quote from another post on TB that makes me think of power amp with sansamp:
    "I am using a Tech 21 Bass Driver. I love it. I was about to sell my Ampeg B2RE but then read on here about a guy who runs the Bass Driver through the power amp input of the B2RE. Its awesome!"
     
  19. silky smoove

    silky smoove Supporting Member

    May 19, 2004
    Seattle, WA
    To address all your points in order:
    1. The VTDI makes this process very very simple and straight forward. More on that later.
    2. Who cares if it's made specifically for bass? Don't get hung up on gear you have, just consider the result.
    3. Any EQ pedal, regardless of power requirements, number of bands, etc. will work, but software EQ will be far more powerful.

    I never said anything about selling the BMax-T, just that it isn't really needed for what I've been suggesting you use for your desired setup.

    Since it's the VTDI, I'll reiterate what I've been saying all along, but will diagram it:

    Bass > VTDI > Unaffected output > Apogee Channel 1 > DAW
    Bass > VTDI > Affected output > Apogee Channel 2 > DAW

    This assumes that your Apogee unit is at least a Duet in terms of inputs. Set the VTDI's controls, which are now only affected channel 2, to be as girthy as you need, push the gain to give a little overdrive and compression, and set the blend to 100%. Using Apogee's Maestro software, or whatever you use for monitor controlling inside your DAW such that the monitor mix, not the input gain to the Apogee unit, is set the mix such that you're getting desirable results from your monitors/headphones. Record your parts. Now in post you can use software EQ (whatever is built into your DAW will likely be more than sufficient for this task) to tailor both the affected and unaffected channels. You'll likely end up with the unaffected (i.e. clean) channel making up the bottom end, the midrange where it's scooped on the VT, and if you need it, the very top end where the VT rolls off. You'll then likely use the affected channel to handle the low and high mids, which will give you the girth and character that you're looking for. You'll then blend the channels in the DAW to taste. Once you're all set with a good rough mix between the two, phase-align the tracks and make any minor adjustments as required. You'll never get things perfectly in phase, but that's okay. Every change you make will have a phase impact, and phase adjustment will similarly impact the sound. Get it where you like it, and call it good.

    One bass, one box, done.
     
  20. Jfever

    Jfever

    Feb 28, 2015
    Thanks a ton.

    Yes I am trying to be using only equipment I need and getting rid of what I don't use. If this works I'm getting rid of the BMAX.
     

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