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Did you learn to play through an instuctor or on your own?

Discussion in 'General Instruction [BG]' started by submelodic, Mar 19, 2002.


  1. Mostly or completely with an instructor.

    26 vote(s)
    8.6%
  2. Mostly or completely on my own.

    225 vote(s)
    74.0%
  3. Both equally.

    53 vote(s)
    17.4%
  1. submelodic

    submelodic

    Feb 7, 2002
    Seattle, WA
    I'm considering an instructor someone who gives you regular lessons as opposed to another player who shows you something.

    Someone can also learn to play by listening to albums, reading books and watching videos.

    What I'm curious about is how many players learned to play WITHOUT an instructor, which is how I learned.

    If you learned on your own how did you do this? Do you think an instructor might help you progress faster?
     
  2. Dave Castelo

    Dave Castelo

    Apr 19, 2000
    Mexico
    i couldnt get an instructor over my city so i began on my own...

    but still i think getting a teacher (a good one) will help you a lot.
     
  3. I'm currently learning by myself but I may get into a music school in September.
     
  4. jazzbo

    jazzbo

    Aug 25, 2000
    San Francisco, CA
    I learn by myself, with the aid of an instructor.
     
  5. mcbosler

    mcbosler

    May 12, 2000
    Plano, TX
    I don't think anyone is going to say they learned everything through an instructor and nothing at all by themselves. Everyone has to work at least a little bit on their own thing...I think that's what makes music so cool is that everyone's style is just a little bit different because of the mesh of styles they incorporate into their own.
     
  6. I learned by myself, initially with the help of a book, but not for long, as I already had about 10 years of musical experience on the piano and clarinet. There's a good chance I would be a better player if I had of gone to an instructor, but there were none in my area.
     
  7. Turock

    Turock Supporting Member

    Apr 30, 2000
    Melnibone
    I learned to play through an instructor, then I got an amp and now I play through that.
     
  8. Chris Fitzgerald

    Chris Fitzgerald Student of Life Staff Member Administrator

    Oct 19, 2000
    Louisville, KY
    Where did you plug in your cable before you got the amp?
     
  9. Turock

    Turock Supporting Member

    Apr 30, 2000
    Melnibone
    You know.
     
  10. mcbosler

    mcbosler

    May 12, 2000
    Plano, TX
    That's just silly. Everyone knows the resistance on an instructor is way to high for an amp to handle.
     
  11. i took lessons for about 9 months and it helps alot. especially when first starting out. however, lessons are 1 hour or so a week. that leaves much work to be done on your own. its like a coach might help you run faster, but you still have to use your legs.
     
  12. Honestly: by myself.

    Classes are due sometime in the future... out there... yeah...

    I had a tape which showed fingerings for major, minor, and pentatonic scales. It also showed some very basic approaches to playing.

    After that, just practice and learning songs by ear... then TB came in AND MY LIFE CHANGED FOREEEEVEEEEEEEERRRRR!!!!!!!!!!!

    uh, not quite, actually :rolleyes:

    But I now know more about basic (I SAID BASIC) theory and what the aforementioned scales are all about, thanks to the TB GI crew (RAMBO, GEE WEEDS WITH CAR, RED RUCKA, ETC.) and Internet sources.

    I'm still pentagram-impaired, though. That I'll tackle later...sometime...


    NUT WITH WAFER
     
  13. Fuzzbass

    Fuzzbass P5 with overdrive Supporting Member

    I started out self-taught. For three years I noticed constant improvement through self-study and regular practice. Playing bass (which was my 1st choice) was great in that I could always find a band, and being in a band kept me motivated to practice almost every day.

    After three years I realized I was getting stuck in a rut... box patterns and basic blues riffs. Even after taking a basic theory course in college I decided I needed one-on-one instruction. I didn't take bass lessons per se; I took theory from a guitarist. The greatest thing he taught me was how to play in any key in any mode in any position on the fretboard.

    That has served me fine for most forms of rock music, which is all I've ever wanted to play. But when it comes to jazz improv, I'm a poor hack.

    In short: I'm a weekend rocker, and I've never wanted to be any more than that. If you have any intention of making a living in music (or even making serious money part-time) you should learn from an instructor. The only exception would be if you have the ability to know what you need to learn and the discipline to teach yourself (much easier said than done). I'm not talking just bass playing, I'm talking music theory: counterpoint, chord substitution, all that good stuff.
     
  14. jazzbo

    jazzbo

    Aug 25, 2000
    San Francisco, CA
    You have to bridge your instructors.
     
  15. Well...if you got at least 2 instructors...you could run them in parallel and reduce the instructance by the formula

    1 / I total = (1 / I1) + (1 / I2)
     
  16. jazzbo

    jazzbo

    Aug 25, 2000
    San Francisco, CA
    I always thought that the ratio was different.

    1 / I total = (1 / I*1/2) + (1 / I*1/2) + 3.14
     
  17. I first bought a book and learned everything in that. Then I went to an instructor for about 6 months. Then, since I cuoldn't afford it anymore, I stopped with the instructor. Ever since then, I've taught myself.
     
  18. Chris Fitzgerald

    Chris Fitzgerald Student of Life Staff Member Administrator

    Oct 19, 2000
    Louisville, KY


    "GEE WEEDS WITH CAR"??? :confused:
     
  19. submelodic

    submelodic

    Feb 7, 2002
    Seattle, WA
    I identify with what Fuzzbass said. I'm in a rut, which is why I posted the poll. I'm not talking so much about technique as I am about ideas to play.

    I guess the next step might be to find a good instructor for some theory lessons. If anyone can recommend good books or videos on basic to intermediate theory I'd appreciate it.
     
  20. i played for 2 years on my own using books and videos, but now i've got a teacher and i learnt more in the first 2 months than i did in a year on my own

    (i had done everythong right and had the right technique, i just needed to know where to go next)

    l8rz

    Tom