Psst... Ready to join TalkBass and start posting, make new friends, sell your gear, and more?  Register your free account in 30 seconds.

Diff between 3 Duncan pickups

Discussion in 'Pickups & Electronics [BG]' started by Growler, Jul 28, 2005.


  1. Growler

    Growler

    Sep 26, 2004
    Can anybody describe the difference between Duncan (Going into a MiM P, and I play mostly classic rock (boston, aerosmith etc..):

    SPB-1
    SPB-2
    SPB-3 (quarter pound).

    I'm having a bit of a time figuring out what the differences between them in Duncan's chart http://www.basslines.com/website/tonechart.shtml#bass

    -Thanks
    Growler
     
  2. gilbert46

    gilbert46

    Sep 21, 2004
    Sacramento, CA
    Vintage


    Hot



    REALLY Hot.
     
  3. Growler

    Growler

    Sep 26, 2004
    Not to be a smarta$$, but could you translate what you mean by Vintage/Hot/Really Hot? An example of a tune that might have a hot/hotter/hottest perhaps?

    -Thanks
    Growler
     
  4. gilbert46

    gilbert46

    Sep 21, 2004
    Sacramento, CA
    output. the vintage SPB-1 has less windings and less output for a more mellow sound. the SPB-2 has more output for a fatter more aggressive tone. The SPB-3 has loads of output and would cut through a loud band. the SPB-3 is also called a Quater Pounder because of its 1/4 exposed rods. The SPB-3 is popular in rock because it is hot, aggressive and clear.
     
  5. Nedmundo

    Nedmundo Supporting Member

    Jan 7, 2005
    Philadelphia
    Take a look at Seymour Duncan's site, which describes them and provides frequency bar graphs to show the differences. I'll summarize though.

    The SPB-1 is vintage, the SPB-2 has more coil windings for more output, which boosts mids (probably low mids) and reduces treble. I have this one, and it is indeed "fat and punchy" as Duncan claims. I might even need to BOOST treble on my amp, which feels bizarre when playing a P-bass, and might be taboo in some circles. ;) It retains some vintage vibe, but with high output, which is exactly what I wanted. I don't think it's quite the punker pickup like a Quarter Pounder or DiMarzio Model P (which I used to have), but it's pretty hot. So far I like it.

    The Quarter Pounder has even higher output, plus extended response in the lows and highs for a more moder, mid-scooped sound. Some say it's for hard rock/punk only, but I've read reviews saying it's extremely useful for many styles with proper use of hand position, EQ, etc. (But isn't that true for many p'ups?) At least you can try this one, because it's on the Mark Hoppus signature Fender.