Digitech BP50 vs Alesis BassFX

Discussion in 'Effects [BG]' started by Mikefish07, Apr 6, 2003.

  1. Mikefish07


    Apr 6, 2003
    I have a GT6B but wanted a small multifx battery operated unit for short gigs. Can anyone tell me is the BP50 is noisy? Is it better to use seperate foot pedals? Is the Alesis BassFX unit available yet? Thanks in advance for the feedback.
  2. Jazz Ad

    Jazz Ad Mi la ré sol Gold Supporting Member Supporting Member

    BP50 and 200 are ok but noisy.
    Haven't got a chance to try the Alesis.
    The Zoom BFX708 II is honest.

    The Korg AX-1B is still miles ahead of all other cheapo bass multieffects, IMHO.
    Especially now that you can find it for less than 100.
  3. bassackwards

    bassackwards Member

    Dec 16, 2002
    I just got the Digitech BP50 a couple hours ago. I like it a lot. I was going to get the ZOOM BFX708II (because I sold my BFX708 to buy one) but I decided the only thing better about it for me was the sampler function and I probably wouldn't use it much anyway. The Digitech sounds better, is less noisey (not noisey at all, really), and the "small enough to toss in gig-bag " factor made it a better choice for my current purposes. The guy threw in the adapter for half price and some free batteries, also. So, it was $89.ooUSD with the adapter and a set of batteries. The sounds and general tone are VERY impessive for such a small inexpensive unit. It really blows away the ZOOM on many levels and sounds much richer than the KORG on most settings. The phase and flange will smoke your KORG's phase and flange (sorry JazzAd) and the distortions and ODs are better too. The BigMuff simulation is better than a reall BigMuff!The amp and stompbox simulations are awsome and the best I've ever heard on this type of unit. You can turn the cab simulator on and it will automatically select the right cab to go with your amp sim. The synth settings are also the best I've ever heard on an entry level processor and quite useable. Auto-wahs are really good (again, the best I've heard on an entry-level unit) and the fretless sim is a punchy mofo that I definitely plan to record with. I also must mention some CRAZY octavider presets that sound incredibly freaky and will scare the crap out of your cat:eek: . The octave and pitch effects are great, in general. I've yet to mess with anything but the factory presets but, I'm quite impressed so far. The only thing that's better on the ZOOM are the drum sounds. The BP50's drum sounds have some major cheese factor going on, even though they're pretty dynamic and the patterns are decent. Just not the best kit selection. Allthough, some people like the drums because when I was trying it out some guy walked by and said "That sounds really good, is that your custom kit on your drum machine?" When I showed him what I was using, he was quite impressed. All that being said, I don't personally care for the drum sounds but they may be good for ocasional practice. I haven't tried the Alesis unit (is that even available yet?) but, I'd like to. I think it's 24-bit (I mean, 24-bit.......biiiaaatch!), also. All in all, the BP50 is an exceptional unit for the price and size and it's the first entry-level unit I've tried that I'd even recomend for recording (well, not to the tone-nazis, but to the Average Joe-bassist) and will probably use fairly frequently for that purpose. There must be something to that "Audio-DNA" IC-chip because some of this new Digitech stuff is sounding pretty good, for digital.

    edit:I can't beleive I forgot to mention the reverb and delays! They are perhaps one of the BP50's stronger points and follow the long tradition of Digitechs bitchin' digital delays. VERY good.
  4. Mikefish07


    Apr 6, 2003
    Thanks for the feedback! Since these are inexpensive pedals, I was worried about the noise level. I think I'll go get the BP50.