1. Please take 30 seconds to register your free account to remove most ads, post topics, make friends, earn reward points at our store, and more!  
     
    TalkBass.com has been uniting the low end since 1998.  Join us! :)

Disappearing notes

Discussion in 'Amps and Cabs [BG]' started by AaronS, Apr 16, 2006.


  1. I am developing a friendship with a new band forming in the area. I went to their gig last night and I was paying most attention to the bass player. His chops were good. But it seemed like when he got particularly syncopated with some fast frills the 16th notes disappeared. I could see his fingers, I knew in my head what the line should sound like, but some of the notes just seemed to disappear and then the sound picked up again later in the bar. If there were 12 notes in the bar, it was like notes 4 and 5 and 9 and 10 just disappeared between his fingers and my ears. I am wondering if it could be his amp. He was playing through an SWR Workingman's 4004 into a Goliath III on top of a GK RBH 115. It was not an extremely loud band, the guitars were playing through Roland Cubes. Any ideas?
     
  2. 4Mal

    4Mal Supporting Member

    Jun 2, 2002
    Columbia River Gorge
    Sounds like his technique needs work ... or he's developing a ghost note style that sounds a lot like like dropped notes... maybe he should concentrate on getting the eigth note runs clean and work up to 16th's ... or focus on saying more with less ?
     
  3. I wondered about that, and I watched his fingers pretty closely. I think he was hitting the strings solidly and he seemed to be pretty loose, not like these were new lines to him. That's why I began to wonder if it could be something with his rig.
     
  4. chaosMK

    chaosMK

    May 26, 2005
    Albuquerque, NM
    Hi-fi into an old tube amp
    I doubt it was the gear.

    Try doing the type of stuff that you saw him doing and you will get the idea. It can be a challenge to mute and accent stuff correctly at high speeds.

    I've never had an amp that caused my notes to disappear.
     
  5. Folmeister

    Folmeister Knowledge is Good - Emile Faber Supporting Member

    May 7, 2003
    Tomball, Texas
    Hmm, I may have actually experienced something like what you a talking about. I have an electric guitarist that constantly plays down in my frequency spectrum and our sound engineer kept telling me that there were times when it sounded like I had stopped playing. I had not, but there was so much bass in the guitar that I think the two competing frequencies were cancelling each other out. I am still trying to work this one out.
     
  6. Hummmm. That sounds like what I was hearing. These guys seem respectful of each other's sonic space, lots of sharing of vocals and leads and the fact that the two guitarists were only using Roland Cubes, says a lot. But they could have been inadvertantly stepping on the bass. I know the sound man and he is very good. I'll ask him if he noticed anything.
     
  7. Groundloop

    Groundloop

    Jun 21, 2005
    Toronto
    Stand on his neck until he agrees to move off your sonic turf.
     
  8. savit260

    savit260

    Mar 6, 2006
    Boston
    I once played a show where one note seemed to keep dissapearing. There was an odd low frequency noise coming through the monitors that was canceling out just one note on my bass. Very strange experience. Every time I'd hit that note, it was like I wasn't playing at all. Always the same note. Shut the monitors off, and the note reappeared.
    STRANGE.
     
  9. anderbass

    anderbass

    Dec 20, 2005
    Phoenix. Az.
    Those Roland cube amps should not be overly bassy.
    Is he doing any extreme E/Q adjustments to the bass or amp?
    Maybe his bass has mis-adjusted pickups.
    Some basses have bad, (dead spot) neck problems.
     
  10. Folmeister

    Folmeister Knowledge is Good - Emile Faber Supporting Member

    May 7, 2003
    Tomball, Texas
    No need, he's getting the canned ham, a trip behind the boathouse, and the home game after the last of our scheduled gigs are done
     

Share This Page