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Displays of affection by audience in concerts. how much should an artist endure?

Discussion in 'Miscellaneous [BG]' started by Blackbird, Apr 12, 2001.


  1. Blackbird

    Blackbird Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Mar 18, 2000
    California
    I went to a great concert. It was the cuban singer/composer Pablo Milanes. The music was great. The only thing that chagrined me a bit was that the bass player (playing a Yamaha TRB-6) would sometimes double on guitar synth, leaving the sax player to do the bass line on a keyboard synth. Still, it was a great show.

    What impressed me the most was that in the middle of the show, one woman got onstage, walked to him (who was sitting on a chair with arms extended at the end of a song), kissed his hands and hugged him. It was like she was the was hugging her son that had just been appointed pope (or something like that.) I'm brazilian, not cuban, so I can only begin to fathom the admiration she had for him.

    At the end of the concert, another two or three people went on stage, one shook his hand, another one asked the sax player to take a picture of both! Imagine that this same episode probably happens everywhere Pablo performs. Sure, he wants to please his fans, but even that has a limit. The man came to perform. Handshakes and photo-ops were not part of the deal, however, he was in no position to turn people away, with a hall packed with fans. I often read that fame is not all it's cracked up to be, but I had never witnessed an artist paying the price for his fame.

    Any thoughts? Anyone seen anyone else in the same situation?

    Oh, and if you want some great cuban music get a Pablo Milanes cd. He's really something. Non spanish speakers won't get the full impact, I should add

    Will C.:cool:
     
  2. jazzbo

    jazzbo

    Aug 25, 2000
    San Francisco, CA
    Well, sometimes it depends on the artist. Miles Davis was turning his back to the audience, almost in contempt. Then again, some artists sincerely appreciate their fans. Two quick examples are Harry Connick, Jr. and Tori Amos. But those two artists set aside time before or after the show to meet and greet. Running on stage is just plain inappropriate. Extended applause, standing ovations, these are sincere forms of flattery; but when people are walking on stage during, or right after, a performance, this seems more like selfish adulation. Respect the artists. If they want to set the time aside, then talk with them then. Show your adoration respectfully and appropriately. Remember that they're people too, and they're essentially at "work" (granted it's a kick-ass job!).
     
  3. penstock

    penstock

    Aug 10, 2000
    At least he's getting hugs. I got hit with a polish sausage at the last show my band played. It was thrown by a guy that liked us, too. Oh well.
     
  4. Nails

    Nails

    Jun 4, 2000
    Austin, Tejas
    I agree with Jazzbo. I would love to meet and hang out with some of my favorite bands, but I also realize they're doing their job, and often have to hop on a bus to go to the next show. I would never think of jumping on stage during a show, unless I was invited by the artist where I would jump up in a second. But alot of artist do set aside time before/after to meet and greet, that's where you should tell them what you think, shake hands, etc. never on stage. But that's just what I think.
     
  5. JWC

    JWC Banned

    Oct 4, 2000
    Big Wheel, don't delete please :)

    Do you not think being a musician has its parts which just irk the hell out of the him or her? I mean, look what most people have to endure at work. Evil bosses, pay cuts, overtime, nights and weekends, unemployment, benefit cuts, etc. I think hugs pale in comparison. I think they should all have to endure fan support. The fansa make it possible.
     
  6. jazzbo

    jazzbo

    Aug 25, 2000
    San Francisco, CA
    Would you include all celebrities. How about Princess Diana?
     
  7. JWC

    JWC Banned

    Oct 4, 2000
    you are so right....they guy who killed her was just chasing after her for a hug....
     
  8. jazzbo

    jazzbo

    Aug 25, 2000
    San Francisco, CA
    Ahh, but that's not what you said. What you said was that "I think they should all have to endure fan support." Direct quote. So I was not referring to hugs. The point I'm making is that many fan's support is fanatical.
     
  9. JWC

    JWC Banned

    Oct 4, 2000
    Yeah, but invasion of private life by the paparazzi is WAY different ya know.
     
  10. jazzbo

    jazzbo

    Aug 25, 2000
    San Francisco, CA
    True.
     
  11. Blackbird

    Blackbird Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Mar 18, 2000
    California
    Bump!

    Will C.:cool:
     
  12. Two shows in San Francisco in 94-95 come to mind.

    I was at a Liz Phair solo electric show once where she invited everyone in the audience up on stage, and a few hundred people probably went up there while she played her last song. That was kind of nice, and nobody did anything inappropriate.

    A few months earlier, I was at a Diamanda Galas / John Paul Jones show with DG playing Organ, some not very stable-looking guy sneaks up and sits next to her on the bench. If you've heard the songs from that album, it's surprising she didn't eviscerate him and leave him quivering while she danced in his entrails shrieking.
     
  13. I saw Duncan Sheik and his opening act Fisher about a week ago.It was a full house ,but, an intimate show.People/fans voiced their approval and asked questions in between songs.Fisher,handled the interaction very well,in fact,she welcomed the it(however,nobody got on stage to invaded her personal space.)Duncan Sheik had many adoring fans who were very vocall as well.One happy drunk kept piping in.Mr. Sheik didn't seem to mind.I think the crowd did get tired of the loudmouth and told him to shut up so that the headliner could continue.After the show Duncan signed autographs and stayed to make sure he didn't forget anyone.He could have easily left immediately after his encore but chose to mingle with us.He was very humble and I apologized for the loud drunk who ran his mouth.Duncan was not in the least bit offended by it.He seemed greatful that the crowd would want to be involved with the show.
    I hope he goes far and has an enduring career.I couldn't have met a nicer human being.
     
  14. I think an important part of the scenario described is how the artist responded to the fan. You said that he had his arms open wide! That tells me that not only has he experienced this before but he welcomed the contact. If there wasn't a security goon pouncing on them, then it might have even been expected. I think that your take on this is probably too deeply colored by your own personal preferences and not that of the artist.
     
  15. snyderz

    snyderz

    Aug 20, 2000
    AZ mountains
    Victor Wooten takes a quick break after his shows, then comes out and hangs with his fans. Autographs, photo ops, you name it. He is very gracious and humble.
    Doc
     
  16. Blackbird

    Blackbird Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Mar 18, 2000
    California
    Uh, Hammy, Pablo's arms were open wide, but he just happenned to be in that position at the time. He wasn't opening his arms to meet the fan. I thought I was clear enough about that. at least no one else who replied so far got the impresion you did.

    My words were "He was sitting with arms extended at the end of a song" not "He received the fan with open arms". I was there and I know what I saw. I'm sure he experienced that before, but to say he "welcomed it", well, I suppose your perception is being "deeply colored by your personal preferences".

    I suppose you think he welcomed the guy who rushed the stage with a camera and asked the sideman to take a picture of him with Pablo too. I didn't mention this, but when they guy was leaving the stage, he had his arms up, as if he had just achieved a personal triumph.

    The point about the bouncer is a good one. I should point out that the Warfield is a theater, with tables at the bottom level and theater style seating. It's not really a "Bouncer" kind of venue.

    I don't wanna make this description too complicated. I suppose you had to be there.

    And snyderz, that may be true, but Wooten's not comparable in terms of fame. Pablo's fame is comparable to Sting's. For cubans and other people of latin origin, that is.


    Will C.:cool:
     
  17. Every time I see GWAR they are nice to their fans.
    I met a bunch of them after a show in Boston and they were real friendly, giving out free memorabilia and all. On stage it is a different story, they invite fans on stage and push them into a huge meat grinder.:D
     
  18. Being appreciated by the audience should be and ususlly is a cherished thing for every performer. But Fanatical followers can be disturbing especially when they crash the stage, or follow you around spying on your every move, whether it is the dog press or some spooky admirer. To me stage crashing is rude and disturbing not only to the performers but to the rest of the audience as well. While I appreciate artists taking the time to meet and greet I also respect their privacy. AS a player that has toured as a side man with a star performer I can say that there can be some are some scarry fans out there and I even gave one of them a pretty harsh physical rebuff for harassing the band and the star and have no guilt for doing so.
     
  19. gweimer

    gweimer

    Apr 6, 2000
    Columbus, OH
    For you geezers, Peter Gabriel used to allow himself to be carried around the front of the audience at one point.
    Iggy Pop did the same, but he usually came back hurt!