1. Please take 30 seconds to register your free account to remove most ads, post topics, make friends, earn reward points at our store, and more!  
     
    TalkBass.com has been uniting the low end since 1998.  Join us! :)

DIY Powered Sub

Discussion in 'Amps and Cabs [BG]' started by Count Bassie, Apr 2, 2013.


  1. Count Bassie

    Count Bassie Supporting Member

    Jun 10, 2006
    Smithfield, RI
    Just interested in the concept. What's the practicality of actually building a self-powered sub with a hi-pass filter? Say, just enough power to give the deeper lows some 'presence'? Can this be DIY'd from standard, consumer-available parts?

    I want the cab to be dimensionally and cosmetically like what I already have (I can build the cab) that I can line-into from my head, while running the head full-range into my regular, not-lows-heavy cab.

    Simple enough?

    Thanks for your time...
     
  2. Hi.

    IMHO, by Your description you're aiming to the "not feasible to DIY" kind of cab.

    It's virtually impossible to compete with the industry leaders, unless You just want to build an active sub/cab, regardless of the cost.

    That said, I've been drooling over the Hypex plate amps, but that's a lot more thump than just "just enough power to give the deeper lows some 'presence'" ;).

    Regards
    Sam
     
  3. I use a Parts Express plate amp to power the horn sub connected to my home theater setup.
    These are not air tight, so they require a sealed sub-chamber in your project.
    These have a built-in crossover, low pass filter and gain control.
    The input is consumer level RCA, or speaker-out.

    I'd be more inclined toward an air-head with a standard 19" rack amplifier that accepts standard LINE level inputs.
    Then you would need an active crossover. More $$, more rackspace.

    Think this through carefully before spending $$ to avoid mistakes.
     
  4. Foz

    Foz

    Jul 26, 2008
    Jax FL USA
  5. The IPR 1600 (non DSP) also has a fixed 100 Hz roll-off for sub use.
     
  6. Count Bassie

    Count Bassie Supporting Member

    Jun 10, 2006
    Smithfield, RI
    Well I see that, so far, it appears I won't be building a self-powered sub! Looks like a passive box with a power amp. Had to ask! Thanks all...

    The Peavey could be interesting I guess. What got me on for it was the new GK powered bass cabs. Cool idea, I suppose we'll be seeing more stuff like that soon.
     
  7. KPJ

    KPJ

    Oct 2, 2001
    Methuen, MA USA
    The GK cabs are a specific application, though, Roger. They will only work with the GK combos or with a device that has the proper output. Roland made a powered 15" sub for a few years that could either be paired with their combo amps or any other amp that had an effects send or unbalanced line out. It also had a separate tweeter with its own amp that could be switched on or off so it could be used full-range. It was a pretty cool idea and would work well with any preamp, but unfortunately it was too expensive and never caught on. The idea has been there, it just has been poorly executed or, as in the case of the Bergantino IP cabs and another brand that is escaping me ATM (IPR?), too expensive or nichey.
     
  8. Count Bassie

    Count Bassie Supporting Member

    Jun 10, 2006
    Smithfield, RI
    I wasn't sure about the GK thing, but that's what I thought. Right, as I figured at this point, it'll be power amp / sub-able cab...

    Thanks for the illumination, Kev.
     
  9. With the bass cab playing full range there's a risk they won't play nicely together. Might as well build a FF or BFM combo if you're going to all that trouble.
     
  10. Count Bassie

    Count Bassie Supporting Member

    Jun 10, 2006
    Smithfield, RI
    I guess that's interesting. I sort of figured the less present lows-signal in the full-range cab might be upstaged by the sub. You say not, eh? Actually sounds pretty reasonable.

    A BFM might be my next move in such a case.
     
  11. The bass cab will be progressively less upstaged up the range as it gets more efficient. Might be fine, might get wacky on some notes.
     
  12. seamonkey

    seamonkey

    Aug 6, 2004
    You can take a powered sub and put it in the effects send/return loop. The sub should have an active crossover that sends the mids/highs back to your head.

    Anybody can do this. Anybody who wants more volume, and still keep the same "tone" - then add a sub. It's that simple. It's not a lot of extra gear to carry. Just a sub, a couple of cables, and a power cord.

    You can end up with something much better than you can buy if you build a bill fitzmaurice design. Otherwise I can't see how you can save any money over what is already flooding the market.
     
  13. Count Bassie

    Count Bassie Supporting Member

    Jun 10, 2006
    Smithfield, RI
    Could A/B box to the input, send one side to the amp via my fDeck Hi-pass Filter... the other side straight to the powered cab, maybe with a Sansamp or similar in front of it.

    Of course I'm not getting into all that...
     
  14. Count Bassie

    Count Bassie Supporting Member

    Jun 10, 2006
    Smithfield, RI
    This seems to make sense, and I get it on all points. So I've been talked out of building one, screw it! I still think a powered sub is a good idea, and if it's this easy, I have only money as an obstacle. That's not hard...

    Many thanks Seamonkey. And thanks to all for your info/input/knowledge and opinions. :cool:
     
  15. Count Bassie

    Count Bassie Supporting Member

    Jun 10, 2006
    Smithfield, RI
    Okay I got my editing all squared away now!
     
  16. Active electronics in your effect loop would be a good way to go.
     
  17. Count Bassie

    Count Bassie Supporting Member

    Jun 10, 2006
    Smithfield, RI
    I don't understand...
     
  18. Almost same as what Seamonkey was suggesting. A crossover in your f/x loop turns your amp + slave powered sub into a fully biamped rig.
     
  19. Count Bassie

    Count Bassie Supporting Member

    Jun 10, 2006
    Smithfield, RI
    So how does one go about inserting a crossover "into" an fx loop? Just get a rack-mount x-over and loop it in?

    Sorry to be so blame stupid here!
     
  20. Count Bassie

    Count Bassie Supporting Member

    Jun 10, 2006
    Smithfield, RI
    Okay, I get it. It's late, I'm tired. But I get it... ha...
     

Share This Page