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DL1608 channel mute per aux/mon revelation

Discussion in 'Live Sound [BG]' started by Scottkarch, Oct 2, 2017.


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  1. Scottkarch

    Scottkarch

    Sep 11, 2012
    Chicago
    We use our Mackie DL1608 for FOH, IEM mixes and music before, between and after sets. The default mute mode is called LR mute.

    If a channel gets muted from ANY screen (LR or aux ) it mutes it everywhere

    Since we have no amps and use electronic drums we hear nothing ( except the music going through the PA ) until our sound guy unmutes all our channels.

    You all may know about this, but I just found a setting PER AUX tonuncheck the LR mute. Unchgecking this allows each aux/mon to mute or unmute any channels just for your aux mix. So we can hear ourself and get our IEMs all sorted while the FOH is playing music. It's going to be so helpful.
    Took me a bit to find but here are some pics.

    Press here to get the menu
    IMG_4081.JPG

    After Unchecking the mute at the top of each channel will say aux mute ( when you are in an AUX )
    IMG_4079.

    Uncheck USE LR MUTE
    IMG_4078.
     
    DirtDog likes this.
  2. Yes I discovered that many ears ago. Good luck. Now if they would add that feature to my XR18 I'd be in mute heaven.
     
  3. Scottkarch

    Scottkarch

    Sep 11, 2012
    Chicago
    We play again next Friday... looking forward to doing a silent IEM mix to get our levels ready without anyone in the restaurant being bothered.

    We played last weekend... we set up, got some basic levels with the FOH muted... generally we're 95% of the way there since we practice with the same mixer. They were shocked that the first thing they heard was our soundcheck song... no "check check" kick kick etc. We just powered up, played 1 song with a couple of us tweaking a couple IEM settings while playing. After one song we were done, covered every thing up and left. They had never seen anything like it and thought we looked "like pros" That really made me feel good. I've worked hard to get us to use technology to do that... and it's really paying off.
     
  4. walterw

    walterw Supportive Fender Gold Supporting Member Commercial User

    Feb 20, 2009
    alpha-music.com
    while you're at it swap your in-ear mixes from "pre-fader" to "pre-DSP", otherwise you get compression and gating in your monitor mix, something you do not want.
     
    s0c9 likes this.
  5. Scottkarch

    Scottkarch

    Sep 11, 2012
    Chicago
    That does make sense.. our sound guy ( the friend that owns the PA tops and subs ) doesnt apply them, doesnt understand them and I don't have the ability to tweak while playing. So, I agree that makes sense, but we don't really have them. But I'll apply it to my aux to test.
    Thank you.
     
  6. BurningSkies

    BurningSkies CRAZY BALDHEAD Supporting Member

    Feb 20, 2005
    Seweracuse, NY
    Yep. Gates and compression are FOH friends. Getting a grasp on gating the kit properly and which instruments or vocals benefit from compression is also a really good move. In moving from a basic 16 channel analog board to a digital mixer and being able to apply these things has stepped up our live sound tremendously for any gigs we have to carry PA.
     
  7. Scottkarch

    Scottkarch

    Sep 11, 2012
    Chicago
    Thanks. I guess I need to learn what to do and get it set on my own time. If anyone has a little time to go over things via phone send me a PM. I'll post back the results to share.
     
  8. walterw

    walterw Supportive Fender Gold Supporting Member Commercial User

    Feb 20, 2009
    alpha-music.com
    with electronic drums you won't need any gating (gates are for keeping toms from ringing too long and kick mics from feeding back low end), so it's mostly compression you want to look into.

    it's good for vocals to make them more balanced and "pro" sounding in the mix, you can keep the singer just above the music without the quiet singing disappearing and the shouts blowing everything up.

    try 4:1 ratio, fastest attack and release, threshold adjusted to where you get a little bit of gain reduction on normal singing, output level adjusted to where it's about the same volume with or without the compression kicked in. that'll serve to make the vocals more even in the mix without obvious compression and helps a lot when you're doing your own sound and can't chase the vocal levels around all night.

    if you find that the vocals are a little hard to get loud enough then raise the threshold a pinch, if you find that they're still "peaky" and uneven lower the threshold a pinch.

    other than that, compressing the bass a little is sometimes useful if the player is changing from fingers to pick to slapping and the levels are uneven.
     
    BurningSkies and Scottkarch like this.
  9. I would not go pre dsp in IEM unless you are using a lot of compression on the vocal channel and if you are then you should split the vocal mikes into 2 channels and use the dry one for IEM. The DSP settings are for stage monitors and sound like crap.
     

  10. You must be vary careful with comps and gates though if you don't know what you are doing, they can set up chain reactions for feedback and singers blowing their voices. When in doubt, don't :)
     
  11. walterw

    walterw Supportive Fender Gold Supporting Member Commercial User

    Feb 20, 2009
    alpha-music.com
    no, that’s the point! set your monitor auxes pre-DSP and none of that stuff shows up in the monitors. no need for splitting channels.

    (also, why is it called “pre-DSP”? it’s a digital board, so isn’t it all “DSP”?)
     
  12. walterw

    walterw Supportive Fender Gold Supporting Member Commercial User

    Feb 20, 2009
    alpha-music.com
    again, setting monitors pre-DSP keeps all that out of the monitor mixes.
     

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